Developing material

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Developing material

Post  Jay Gaydosh on Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:11 pm

Happy 2010, I'm just back from a 2 week visit with PNEUMONIA and trying to catch up on the forum.

As bonsai goes, I'm an absolute newb when it comes to yamadori. In fact, up till now I have concentrated on yamastori, and I believe I am getting better at choosing good nursery stock. While I'm having fun with what I currently have, I am looking to move further into the art.

I have some resources (although the nearest mountain is a two day drive) I have many field hedge rows of osage and other similar types of trees, a few thorny species, some grape vines, etc., available for the developing. I have recently acquired the 2009 edition of the "Trees of Illinois" and I'm trying to figure out how best to grow my forest of native trees for my area and what species fit best with art of bonsai.

IF, I was to begin isolating prospective specimens what can I best do to encourage development to the end result of plucking one from Mother Nature.

I understand the concept of root pruning to develop feeder roots while still in place, but I'm unsure about how far out to go and when best to do it. And, I understand that I can work with trees of various girths to match the size of the prospective trunk and bonsai.

Where I'm most curious, is at what point do we begin cutting back tops, branches and trunks to develop taper and shorten the specimen,. Do we do this for years as we develop the tree for its final resting place or do we wack it off just before harvfesting and work with it under more controlled conditions? I figure it can all be done somewhere between one extreme and the other.

(Yeah, I know, it is a great time of year to READ! But it is also a great time of the year to WRITE!)

I would like to see if some of the more experienced gatherers might shed some light on the subject. Pictures help. Maybe we might be enticed with a pictorial essay on "the search for prospective material", "developing material prior to harvesting", etc. Or just use this thread to piece it together.

A lot of what we have in this forum hits these topics and might be compiled into, I don't know, a step by step essay on the process from start to finish.

Or maybe, someone has their preferred book on the subject that might be the end all to what I just suggested, but I have not yet found.

Thanks,

Jay

Jay Gaydosh
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Developing Yamadori Material

Post  bonsaisr on Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:56 pm

Sorry you were sick, and glad to hear you're feeling better. I hope it didn't ruin your Christmas.
Start with Nick Lenz' book, Bonsai from the Wild. It answers most of those questions.
Iris

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Re: Developing material

Post  Tony on Fri Jan 08, 2010 12:59 am

Hi Jay... great to see you back here hope you are well on the way to recovery.... check out my recent 'fat guy' post on "Developing Yamadori Material" 12 years and its beginning to look summat like Rolling Eyes

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Re: Developing material

Post  chappy56 on Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:09 am

Greetings Jay. I'm from just down the road from you in Springfield, Il. I'm only in my 3rd year of bonsai, but am learning as I go. I too am interested in gathering native trees. I've been told that for the most part trees in our area are not among the best for bonsai, I'm not giving up just yet though.
I'd like to invite you to our club here. It's been around since 1971 and still has some of the original members. Lots of knowledge to be gleaned there. Here's the link to the good stuff.......http://www.bonsaisbs.com
Hope that helps and I'd be glad to meet you.

chappy56
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Re: Developing material

Post  Jay Gaydosh on Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:43 am

Thanks all for the well wishes. As a matter of well being, I became ill the day before Christmas Eve. Missed two weeks of work, 3 Doctors visits and 2 ER visits. Just now feeling somewhat better.

I will in deed look for the books and thread contained in your comments.

Chappy, I'm a member of your club, but can't picture you from your comments. No meeting until February. All my trees are tucked into their respective beds waiting for Mother Nature to blow them a warm, wet kiss! While I figure ways to increase the forest with fewer but more select trees. I have seen a few Osage Orange bonsai, just make sure to remove the "oranges". Lots of what we have in Illinois will work, if you just select the best suited trees, there lies the rub! Finding which ones will work.

Stay warm and try!

Jay

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Re: Developing material

Post  NeilDellinger on Fri Jan 08, 2010 11:44 pm

Jay & Chris (aka Chappy),
As a recent transplant from Central Illinois I would say Illinois has a few (albeit very few) decent species. Hackberry can be found almost anywhere, they are very hardy and grow fast. I would not advise the siberian elm.

Look around fence rows that have been browsed by cattle & horses. Lots of honeysuckle around there as well. Probably a better source for collecting trees are landscapes.

Chris,
Hope your & your family are doing well!

Neil

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Re: Developing material

Post  chappy56 on Sat Jan 09, 2010 3:01 am

Sorry Jay, maybe I didn't recognize you in your Kilt......
Good to catch up to you here too Neil.
I hooked up with a gentleman at work recently that also farms and has given me the okay to come and snoop around his pasture land. Hackberry is the tree I'm hoping for.
I think I may wait till its above zero here though.

chappy56
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Re: Developing material

Post  Jay Gaydosh on Tue Jan 12, 2010 2:08 pm

Chappy,

Put that question on your list of things to ask at the next meeting. Especially if Dr. Folse is there! Several of the more experienced members will have suggestions for native Illinois trees. You can also go to the Extension Office at the fairgrounds and get a copy of the latest edition of the Trees of Illinois. I think it is $10 or $12.

Jay

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Re: Developing material

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