De-mystifying the Chinese as it travelled to the Japanese.

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De-mystifying the Chinese as it travelled to the Japanese.

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Tue Feb 16, 2016 11:59 am

Foilks,

here is a Chinese practice - scholar x is well known and admired, drinks from a stone bowl, which in touching, has his body oils
that can oxidise and dry onto the bowl. The bowl being somewhat porous absorbs his oil and some dust, tea stains etc.
With time it changes the bowl's look, and the body oils in drying glue the dust etc. onto the pot.

Scholar x reaches 98 years and passes away. He leaves behind a wealth of usable philosophies and his fame grows.
Scholar m acquires Scholar x's bowl and put's his mark on it. Rinsing the bowl in clear water, but no soap.
This continues for 100s of years.
Eventually the bowl enters a museum, as great piece of history, as a mark towards great learning and learned men.
Life is more that death.
Memories last until the last human to breathe.

Note however, when an object is considered perfect - example Ru / Ju yao ware.
The glaze is so beautiful, nothing is allowed to grow on it.
See the Percival David foundation on-line for examples.

The example of passed objects, exists in normal families, but Granny Fannynestlenose's teacup is only valuable
to her family, as granny probably was not a Scholar or other, or offered no deep philosophies, but there are
strong memories of love, hate and so on.

The idea of touching the past is very big in China.

You can extend this philosophy to anything.

Most of the Chinese Sayings or Philosophies exist in European practices.
Just in different words.

Example -
Opening the door and saluting the thief - Chinese

Closing the stable door long after the horse has bolted - English

Cutting track for monkey to run - Trinidadian [ monkey = mischief ]

Meaning - not thinking ahead and allowing trouble into your life.

They just seem to be different.

The idea of placing uncomposted oil seed cakes on the soil is the same as cutting grasses and leaving them
on the soil to rot in. No ploughing needed the calcium and other compounds with force the clay to form pebbles
enhancing aeration and drainage.

First is Bonsai Japanese, the second is Estonian.

Bonsai becomes very appealing, when land is tight and/or one lives in an apartment.

Japan pushes trees, Europe pushes flowering and seasoning shrubs [ geraniums and rosemary for example ]

Anyhow, if you read, with time many more "mysterious" practices will become more common as you note
that many other countries do the same, just not with the same words or objects etc.

What is obvious on the Internet is that many don't like to read or read deeply, and get set up as potential
victims for usually sales $$$$$.
Laters.
Khaimraj









Khaimraj Seepersad
Member


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Re: De-mystifying the Chinese as it travelled to the Japanese.

Post  Arthur Joura on Fri Feb 19, 2016 4:28 pm

Khaimraj - I always enjoy reading your posts, not only for the thoughts expressed but for the poetic way you write them. By the way, one practice I can think of that came into existence in China for which there was no similar practice that arose simultaneously parallel in the West is bonsai. Thanks!

Arthur Joura
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Re: De-mystifying the Chinese as it travelled to the Japanese.

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Fri Feb 19, 2016 9:09 pm

Arthur,

thank you.

Maybe we should look at the Olmec, Mayans or Inca or Aztec and see what they might have done.
Archaeologists haven't really looked at that aspect of their lives.

But if you mean West as in Europe, hmm, was there a need ?
They did surround their world with greenery, flowers,herbs and I am sure there was love.
I imagine an old shrub dying would have brought on some amount of sorrow.

I will take a deeper read one of these days and let you know what I find.
Respectfully
Khaimraj


Khaimraj Seepersad
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Re: De-mystifying the Chinese as it travelled to the Japanese.

Post  DougB on Sat Feb 20, 2016 4:34 pm

Nothing to say other than a simple "thanks".

DougB
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Re: De-mystifying the Chinese as it travelled to the Japanese.

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