European wild pear_The Grandma

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European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  Vlad on Tue Dec 15, 2015 1:18 pm

I have collected this pear in 2011 in Central Bohemia.    Due to the fact that  I have managed to take with me only a very limited number of fine roots I have placed the tree into a purpose built small greenhouse.  In the first weeks the plant has been misted a number of times per day and a lamp with blue spectrum has been used to promote the growth of the roots.  The growth in the first two/three years was quite limited.   2014 was quite good.  Repotted in autumn 2014 - no pruning of the roots though.    This year again, no new growth.   It seems that this old lady doesn't like to be touched under her skirt.  On the other side,  I can see a good growth of new roots so I am waiting eagerly for  next growing season.  

Autumn 2010




Winter look 2015.  Height 55 cm.



Many flaws but an eye knocking bark/age/character to balance. What do you think?


If interested please see my blog for more details: http://doriyama.blogspot.cz/


Last edited by Vlad on Wed Dec 16, 2015 9:37 am; edited 1 time in total

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  JimLewis on Tue Dec 15, 2015 3:21 pm

VERY interesting tree.  I love pears as bonsai, but I don't read blogs, so I hope you can continue to update it here from time to time.  Thanks for posting.

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  Precarious on Tue Dec 15, 2015 4:10 pm

Very nice tree. I like the bark very much. It is hard to tell for sure from this angle, but does the branch on the right have a trifurcation that would be in danger of creating a bulge?

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  kevin stoeveken on Tue Dec 15, 2015 4:35 pm

Vlad wrote:It seems that this old lady doesn't like to be touched under her skirt.

show me one that does like it and i'll show you a... oh... never mind. Embarassed Razz Wink

that is one dynamite and dynamic tree !!!
i truly hope she ends up thriving for you in time...


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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  Vlad on Tue Dec 15, 2015 5:04 pm

@ Jim Thank you. I will surely place updates with appropriate comments on the IBC.

@ David Good shooting. There were four branches in fact - see the small stump just in the middle. I would be quite quick to fix it with most of my other trees. With this one it is different. I will take time to see the new growth first.

@ Kevin Thank you for inspiration. I will name one of my next yamadori The Dynamix

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  Herbert A on Tue Dec 15, 2015 5:44 pm

Hi Vlad,

what a nice old Lady :-).
Wild pears dont like to work on her roots if they are not strong. After working on roots they have a poor growth for one, sometimes two years.
Be carefull with this nice wunderful tree.

Thanks for showing.

Herbert

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  kevin stoeveken on Tue Dec 15, 2015 6:04 pm

Vlad wrote:@ Kevin   Thank you for inspiration.  I will name one of my next yamadori The Dynamix

or if she doesnt mind you playing with her roots, she could me a DYNAMINX Wink

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  MichaelS on Fri Dec 18, 2015 12:13 am

Hi Vlad. This is excellent material with fantastic potential. My only concern is the two directions the tree is headed in. Just my opinion of course, but i believe this problem should be resolved in the near future (next couple of years) If left as is, you may find that it will become more and more visually distracting. Either the left or the right movements would be equaly good.

It's very hot today and I don't have much to do so I played around with designs.

Right



Or left. I prefer this but the smaller trunk will have to be brought in closer to the main trunk or removed I think.


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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  kevin stoeveken on Fri Dec 18, 2015 12:30 pm

if this is open for opinions, i agree with michael... except i prefer the first orientation (right) as it seems more "solid"...
the left option, (as presented) looks "tippy" or as if it is falling over (which of course would be easily remedied by a potting angle change)

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Fri Dec 18, 2015 3:47 pm

I like it enough to hope that it survives.

Really like that bark.
Please keep showing Vlad.
Laters.
Khaimraj

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  Vlad on Sat Dec 19, 2015 5:15 pm

It is quite obvious this tree is well above my level - too much respect for it.  If I live in Japan I would find a bonsai master whose trees are close to my soul and let him to style it.  Then ideally the tree will get into a place where it can be viewed by general public.  As this is not the case I would need to find some other solutions.  

Thank you all very much for your +comments, advice and  styling suggestions.

Mike I do appretiate your effort to make two possible designs for me.   I hope there will be more hot days in the future to help me with this tree.  I understand your point regarding the small tree.   The direction and the shape of its trunk is not good and I need to decide how to style it pretty soon.   For some emotional reasons I plan to keep it.   For the main tree - basic care to regain the top health is the No1 priority for me.

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  JimLewis on Sat Dec 19, 2015 7:35 pm

Vlad wrote:It is quite obvious this tree is well above my level - too much respect for it.  If I live in Japan I would find a bonsai master whose trees are close to my soul and let him to style it.  Then ideally the tree will get into a place where it can be viewed by general public.  As this is not the case I would need to find some other solutions.

NO tree should be above anyone's level if he or she isn't in a hellfire hurry to DO SOMETHING.   If nothing else, just work on the roots for this one for the next few years while you study and assess the top.  There are any number of competent bonsaiests in Europe, surely you can get one (or several) of them to take a look.  Visit one of the shows and bring the tree with you.  People will flock to make suggestions.  Just don't take any but the best.


Last edited by JimLewis on Sun Dec 20, 2015 4:22 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : fix one of my many typos these days)

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  AlainK on Sat Dec 19, 2015 9:17 pm

A very promissing tree Vlad.

The bark of wild pear is beautiful. We all long for the flowers on such trees, but when potted it can take a loooong time.

I would personally try to avoid big scars and "jins" and "uro" or other tricks on such a natural-looking tree.

Alain

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  Vlad on Sun Dec 20, 2015 11:40 am

Alain - any idea why the common pears take long time to produce flowers in a pot?

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  AlainK on Sun Dec 20, 2015 11:59 am

I really have no idea. scratch

In nature, I think they have to be at least 10 years old to flower, after reaching a certain height. Maybe pruning them slows the process, even if cultivated species have to be pruned to flower at their best. Hard to tell...

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

Post  JimLewis on Sun Dec 20, 2015 4:23 pm

My little pear has NEVER flowered and I've had it for Many, Many years.  Its parent trees on my Tallahassee farm bloomed profusely every year.

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Re: European wild pear_The Grandma

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