Tree Identification

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Tree Identification

Post  Cordon on Sat Jul 18, 2015 2:47 am

Here's a tree that is growing wild in my landscaping. I'm considering digging it in the spring and trying to make a bonsai out of it, provided it's worth the effort. The foliage and bark looks like plum to me, but I could easily be wrong.

Cordon




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Re: Tree Identification

Post  leatherback on Sat Jul 18, 2015 8:11 am

I would have said, one of the prunus family. So plum could very well be possible. It is just such a huge family.. No flowers of fruits to make life easy right? (And don't come with a picture of the plant loaded with plums now!)

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Re: Tree Identification

Post  beer city snake on Sat Jul 18, 2015 1:50 pm

that bark and trunk looks like burning bush to me...
but that won't be the last time i was wrong  Wink

if it has been in your landscape for a while, what does it do in the spring re: flowers ?
what does the foliage look like in the fall ?

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Re: Tree Identification

Post  JimLewis on Sat Jul 18, 2015 2:11 pm

Apple?

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Tree Identification

Post  Cordon on Sat Jul 18, 2015 6:45 pm

I haven't seen any evidence of flowers, or fruits. I was thinking maybe chokecherry, but without flowers or fruit maybe prunus is as close as we can get.


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Re: Tree Identification

Post  David Brunner on Sat Jul 18, 2015 9:23 pm

Hello Cordon – I think you are on point regarding this being a plum.  My guess is Oregon plum / Klamath plum / Sierra plum, better (or more precisely) called Prunus subcordata.  The young foliage matches quite well to this species (although your photo of the trunk growing up through what seems to be a Pieris is certainly confusing…).   But please know that there are several species of Prunus in your area and several more which are horticulturally-introduced invasives.  As others have said, when it flowers we can be certain.  But I have certainty that if you treat it as Prunus subcordata it will be fine, and it should make an excellent subject for bonsai treatment.

Wishing you all the best!
David B.

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Re: Tree Identification

Post  Cordon on Wed Jul 22, 2015 11:33 pm

David B.

Sorry for the foliage confusion. The Prunus in question is, in fact, growing up through a Pieris. That is why I if I didn't try and dig it, I was going to chop it down. I tend to agree that the leaves look consistent with Prunus subcordata. It does not look like the invasive Prunus lusitanica, or Portugal Laurel. I like the idea of raising a native as a bonsai. Let's hope it responds well. Personally I think we should do more cultivation of our native plants for bonsai. In doing so we will hopefully develop a more unique signature to American bonsai.

Thanks for the replies.

Cordon

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Re: Tree Identification

Post  AlainK on Thu Jul 23, 2015 1:06 am

Here, I'd say wild cherry (bark and leaves), but I'm about 8400 km (5219.52 miles) from Oregon, so... Laughing

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Re: Tree Identification

Post  leatherback on Thu Jul 23, 2015 7:20 am

AlainK wrote:Here, I'd say wild cherry (bark and leaves), but I'm about 8400 km (5219.52 miles) from Oregon, so... Laughing  

Yeah, we are practically neighbours Very Happy

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new wrinkle

Post  Cordon on Mon Jul 27, 2015 6:53 pm

when I was taking a break from sanding my floors this weekend I took another at the feral tree. It may in fact be a runner coming from a landscape tree that has since been cut down. The tree that was cut down as a red-leafed variety. It may have been grafted onto a rootstock which is sending up suckers all over the yard. Oh well, time will tell.

Cordon

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Re: Tree Identification

Post  David Brunner on Tue Jul 28, 2015 6:44 pm

Hello Cordon - with this information I suggest that this is Prunus ceracifera (Cherry Plum).  It is a very common landscape tree in it's red- and purple-leafed forms.  It has become widely naturalized here in California, perhaps in Oregon as well.  It was on my mind while suggesting that your tree may be a horticultural introduction.  These are very tough trees and can make nice bonsai subjects.  The early spring flowing is a real positive.

Wishing you all the best with it!
David B.

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Re: Tree Identification

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