To graft or not to graft.

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To graft or not to graft.

Post  RodWyatt on Tue Apr 28, 2015 10:48 pm

I am wondering if grafting is thought of as TABOO in the Bonsai world. I have an open spot on my Eagle Claw and would like to graft a clipping on to it. ...I just don't want a bunch of ninjas crashing through my wondows in the middle of the night and haul me away.

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  chadley999 on Wed Apr 29, 2015 12:28 am

No sir, grafting is used to great affect in bonsai

http://bonsai4me.com/advanced_techniques.html

You will find many great articles on grafting at that site, and many more besides grafting as well.

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  RodWyatt on Wed Apr 29, 2015 12:34 am

Thank you. I will still feel like I'm cheating in doing so. This is only the 2nd Fall I've had the tree and bought it because it's naturaly formed as a Broom style, but nearly flat on one side. No buds grow where I want them so grafting seems the only way to get the ballance.
Thanks for your prompt reply. Smile

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  M. Frary on Wed Apr 29, 2015 3:08 am

If I may be so bold as to ask. What is an Eagle Claw?

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  RodWyatt on Wed Apr 29, 2015 3:12 am

Sorry, Eagle Claw Japanese Maple. Smile

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  JimLewis on Wed Apr 29, 2015 6:18 pm

Thank you. I will still feel like I'm cheating in doing so.

Me too, but it is often done -- at least with junipers -- which often have all limbs removed and new ones grafted on at "artistic" places. Maybe pines too?

Also, sometimes, with flowering bonsai to get different colors on a single plant.

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  Precarious on Wed Apr 29, 2015 8:38 pm

Rod, I agree with you and Jim- it doesn't feel quite right. If you look on Peter Tea's website, he bought a juniper called 'Big Sexy' (one look and you'll know why) from a collector. PT's plans include grafting new roots where he wants them, and all new branches from a DIFFERENT SPECIES of Juniper! For reasons I can't vocalize well, it makes me a little nauseous.

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  RodWyatt on Thu Apr 30, 2015 1:42 am

The training of a Bonsai is the art. It's like Mr. Miyagi said, "Make like picture." To me the chalange and joy is the training. That's the art. How ever, my tree is nearly void of any branches on one side and no buds are growing there. I'll always fess up to the grafting as a last resort, and offer it as apology. Only seems right.

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  Dave Murphy on Thu Apr 30, 2015 2:31 am

Folks, there's no such thing as cheating in bonsai. If grafting will improve your maple, you should learn how to do it, then do it.

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  Dave Murphy on Thu Apr 30, 2015 2:35 am

Precarious wrote:Rod, I agree with you and Jim- it doesn't feel quite right.  If you look on Peter Tea's website, he bought a juniper called 'Big Sexy' (one look and you'll know why) from a collector.  PT's plans include grafting new roots where he wants them, and all new branches from a DIFFERENT SPECIES of Juniper!  For reasons I can't vocalize well, it makes me a little nauseous.

I'm currently grafting shimpaku on a collected western juniper- RMJ I think.  The original foliage is horribly lanky and prone to rust and other fungal pathogens where I live.  It was collected to be a bonsai and could be an OUTSTANDING bonsai with the right foliage, but will never amount to much as it is.  Personally, I think it would be a waste not to go forward with the grafting.  Just my opinion.


Last edited by Dave Murphy on Thu Apr 30, 2015 2:48 am; edited 1 time in total

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  RodWyatt on Thu Apr 30, 2015 2:44 am

I've grafted before so that aspect of it is no big deal. And I do agree with you Dave. It seems the only answer in some cases for various reasons. I am in no way opposed to it. I grafted 4 wee limbs to fill the void. I'll know in the morning if there are any problems.

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  Precarious on Thu Apr 30, 2015 5:37 am

I can see your point, Dave.

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  john jones on Thu Apr 30, 2015 7:57 pm

Dave Murphy wrote:Folks, there's no such thing as cheating in bonsai.  If grafting will improve your maple, you should learn how to do it, then do it.  

How do you feel about tanuki/phoenix grafts/resurrection grafts?

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Re: To graft or not to graft.

Post  Dave Murphy on Fri May 01, 2015 1:11 am

john jones wrote:
Dave Murphy wrote:Folks, there's no such thing as cheating in bonsai.  If grafting will improve your maple, you should learn how to do it, then do it.  

How do you feel about tanuki/phoenix grafts/resurrection grafts?
I prefer the real thing to a Tanuki (mainly because I can usually ID a tanuki)...but, if they're done well, I can certainly appreciate the skill in creating them.

Dave Murphy
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Re: To graft or not to graft.

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