Pyracantha ishitsuki

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Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  Bruce Winter on Tue Apr 14, 2015 12:11 am

Any suggestions on how to keep the white from "popping" on my point and shoot? Is it the black background? I've never been satisfied with the lack of detail but all the settings just confuse me.
The problem with this bonsai is the rock and base of the trunk and roots are all the same color. Other than that it looks like a good year for berries.

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  Marty Weiser on Tue Apr 14, 2015 4:37 am

Try a off-white or beige background. May make it easier to get more contrast in the roots/rock. Something with reddish tones may also work.

As another point, try rolling your backdrop on a tube rather than folding it. That should help with the rather distracting fold lines.

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  JimLewis on Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:12 pm

Great tree!

Are you using supplemental light? Try NOT to use the flash. The light from the flash, coming directly from the camera "flattens" the image. Light coming in from the side and slightly above the subject is most flattering and promotes better detail.

Good suggestion regarding the folds in the backdrop. Iron it, then roll it.

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  Bruce Winter on Tue Apr 14, 2015 11:39 pm

Marty Weiser wrote:Try a off-white or beige background. May make it easier to get more contrast in the roots/rock. Something with reddish tones may also work.

As another point, try rolling your backdrop on a tube rather than folding it. That should help with the rather distracting fold lines.
Thanks Marty...the roots/rock contrast shown here is as good as it gets. I'm more interested in toning down the white glare of the flowers.

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  Bruce Winter on Tue Apr 14, 2015 11:56 pm

JimLewis wrote:Great tree!

Are you using supplemental light?  Try NOT to use the flash.  The light from the flash, coming directly from the camera "flattens" the image.  Light coming in from the side and slightly above the subject is most flattering and promotes better detail.  

Good suggestion regarding the folds in the backdrop.  Iron it, then roll it.

Thanks Jim...No flash here. It's been pretty ideal light except in this case. Overcast sky in a greenhouse.
Oye, I was hoping no one would say "iron it." I think my mom had an iron. OK, I know she did, and I know I don't.

Now that I'm thinking about it I had the same problem with this bottlebrush in an off white pot that shows up a glaring white. I think it's something to do with the camera settings.

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  kevin stoeveken on Wed Apr 15, 2015 5:34 pm

you can also probably take care of it in your edit settings on your computer (simple preinstalled windows program or equivelant)...
if there is an option for editing light, contrast, highlites, shadows, etc, just play around with that...

regarding the sheet that aint gonna iron itself:
just get it really soaking wet and then hang it by just 2 corners to air dry in that wonderful tropical breeze...

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  GreenLarry on Wed Apr 15, 2015 9:33 pm

Can you alter the exposure? The black background might be fooling the camera's meter into thinking the scene is too dark and so increasing exposure. My little compact has exposure compensation, press  one of the keys up on the D pad and alter exposure minus  1 or more stops.
There's like a slider that runs like this:
- 2--1--0--1--2 + with a sliding symbol beneath it.


Last edited by GreenLarry on Wed Apr 15, 2015 9:34 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : typo)

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  Bruce Winter on Thu Apr 16, 2015 7:19 am

beer city snake wrote:you can also probably take care of it in your edit settings on your computer (simple preinstalled windows program or equivelant)...
if there is an option for editing light, contrast, highlites, shadows, etc, just play around with that...

regarding the sheet that aint gonna iron itself:
just get it really soaking wet and then hang it by just 2 corners to air dry in that wonderful tropical breeze...
Ah yes, the wonderful tropical breeze. I've heard of it. 45-50F not so much. This is the time of year when we ask ourselves, "what are we doing here?"

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  Bruce Winter on Thu Apr 16, 2015 7:21 am

GreenLarry wrote:Can you alter the exposure? The black background might be fooling the camera's meter into thinking the scene is too dark and so increasing exposure. My little compact has exposure compensation, press  one of the keys up on the D pad and alter exposure minus  1 or more stops.
There's like a slider that runs like this:
- 2--1--0--1--2 + with a sliding symbol beneath it.
This is along the lines I was thinking, Green. But reading the camera instructions is worse than tax forms.

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  GreenLarry on Thu Apr 16, 2015 8:44 am

Bruce Winter wrote:
GreenLarry wrote:Can you alter the exposure? The black background might be fooling the camera's meter into thinking the scene is too dark and so increasing exposure. My little compact has exposure compensation, press  one of the keys up on the D pad and alter exposure minus  1 or more stops.
There's like a slider that runs like this:
- 2--1--0--1--2 + with a sliding symbol beneath it.
This is along the lines I was thinking, Green. But reading the camera instructions is worse than tax forms.
What camera is it? (Nice pyracantha BTW)

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  Bruce Winter on Thu Apr 16, 2015 8:43 pm

DMCFS3 Lumix

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  kevin stoeveken on Thu Apr 16, 2015 9:22 pm

you can also intentionally fool your camera by aiming at the lighter area, then half-cocking your shutter to lock in the exposure and then moving the view to the area you are photographing... but that also locks in the focus, so keep that in mind.

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  GreenLarry on Thu Apr 16, 2015 10:41 pm

Bruce Winter wrote:DMCFS3 Lumix

Ah I used to have a Lumix FZ7! Good cameras with some exposure control

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  GreenLarry on Thu Apr 16, 2015 10:45 pm

beer city snake wrote:you can also intentionally fool your camera by aiming at the lighter area, then half-cocking your shutter to lock in the exposure and then moving the view to the area you are photographing... but that also locks in the focus, so keep that in mind.
Not all cameras allow this. My former camera didn't (yet my phone sort of does)

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Too late for the pyracantha, but...

Post  Bruce Winter on Wed Apr 22, 2015 7:00 am

beer city snake wrote:you can also intentionally fool your camera by aiming at the lighter area, then half-cocking your shutter to lock in the exposure and then moving the view to the area you are photographing... but that also locks in the focus, so keep that in mind.
Kevin, my hat's off to you! It's too late for the pyracantha as the flowers are dropping and green berries are forming, but here is what is locally called volcano plum, I think it's santa rosa. There are old orchards of these plums that supplied the pacific fleet with plums in WW2, now choked out by invasive species. This is an air/layer of a branch  of one of them. Going on the second year in a pot. I was surprised by the amount of flowers. The first shot is point-and-shoot and the second time I shot a white piece of paper approximately the same distance as the bonsai half way as you advised and then all the way at the tree and voila! It worked!   I didn't notice folds in the backdrop 'till it was too late. Oh well.

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Re: Pyracantha ishitsuki

Post  GreenLarry on Wed Apr 22, 2015 8:09 am

If you can lock exposure get yourself a grey card, and point it at that then use that as your exposure. As long as the grey card is in the same light as the subject you'll be fine. (You can also use it to set white balance)


Last edited by GreenLarry on Wed Apr 22, 2015 8:10 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : typo)

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