Is this a canker?

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Is this a canker?

Post  Oleg6 on Wed Feb 25, 2015 9:15 pm

Hi everyone,

I have a Fukien Tea that has been ailing for a year and I would say is dead now.   It looks like N. gallingina I found it here with pic. http://maple.dnr.cornell.edu/pubs/diseases/bark.htm
I have taken some shots of mine, could anyone verify that it is a canker?  As I understand it, this is fatal 100% of the time on the trunk , the question is can anything be salvaged.  The leaves are all but gone, what 's left are dry and limp, I have scratched an upper branch and there is green in the bark above the canker, I scratched below the canker just above the root and no green.   Airlayer; from what I have read it will not grow roots as an airlayer without leaves is this right?  Trunk Chop; will the trunk of a Tea tree shoot if I chop below the canker?

Thanks for your help.

Chris

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My Pics I hope.

Post  Oleg6 on Wed Feb 25, 2015 9:30 pm



Chris

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Re: Is this a canker?

Post  JimLewis on Wed Feb 25, 2015 9:38 pm

I'm not certain what it is we're supposed to be looking at. That large oval scar is from a branch being pruned away some time ago. The white on the trunk may be an artifact of the photography; it certainly doesn't look like anything deadly to the tree. To me.

Trees die from many causes. Perhaps a few words about how and where you have been caring for it may be called for?

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Is this a canker?

Post  Oleg6 on Wed Feb 25, 2015 10:12 pm

Hi Jim,

Thanks for your quick response, the oval scar is what we are looking at and no branch was cut. The pic of a canker in my link does look like this though. I have just looked at a previous picture of the tree, it wasn't very clear and there was a small bud but no hole, this looks like it has been ripped off. The tree was great until last spring when it started loosing leaves around March, it had done very well in the house for the winter for 3 previous years. I repotted it April last year (roots were small and feeble for three years in a pot, it was in sandy soil) in 30% river stone, 30% black lava & 30% DE and put it outside keeping things moderate, temp between 15C-25C & 2 hrs morn. sun. It struggled all year and through the winter, it was tented all winter for the humidity. It may be alive but has put out no leaves for four months.

Thanks

Chris

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Re: Is this a canker?

Post  JimLewis on Thu Feb 26, 2015 2:51 pm

Odd. You can see where callus has formed around the scar, long enough ago to grow mature-looking bark of its own. So it is not a new wound. It just doesn't look like an active disease to me.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Is this a canker?

Post  Oleg6 on Thu Feb 26, 2015 3:52 pm

N. galligena causes cankers that differ markedly from those described for N. cinnabarina When an infected tree is dormant, N. galligena advances into healthy bark, killing it. During the following growing season, the tree responds with a new layer of bark and undifferentiated wood (callus) to contain the pathogen. However, in the next dormant season the pathogen breaches that barrier and kills additional bark. Over the years, this seasonal alternation of pathogen invasion and host defense response leads to development of a "canker" with concentric ridges of callus tissue—a "target canker" (figure on the right). Other fungi also cause target cankers, but cankers caused by N. galligena are unique in that bark on their faces usually falls away as the cankers expand.
Close examination of crevices along canker margins may also reveal the presence of clusters of minute, red spheres that are the spore-producing bodies of N. galligena. However, these are often sparse and difficult to see; failure to find them should not rule out diagnosis of the disease.

Thanks Jim, you may be right. I couldn't see any spheres with a loupe but the picture looks so close as does the explanation. I have never seen one on my trees so I don't see how my tools could be infected unless it can transfer by touch, say I was doing yard work and touched the wound?

Thanks again

Chris


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Re: Is this a canker?

Post  Haider000000 on Tue Mar 17, 2015 12:23 pm

I had 4 yellow leaf that I removed from the tree. No leaf has fallen and all leaves with black spots are still green. hope you can help me. ????



Ali

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Re: Is this a canker?

Post  JimLewis on Tue Mar 17, 2015 12:58 pm

Haider000000 wrote:I had 4 yellow leaf that I removed from the tree. No leaf has fallen and all leaves with black spots are still green. hope you can help me. ????



Ali

What kind of tree? A picture of the tree and the leaves with spots will help us help you. It also will be better if you start a new topic.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Is this a canker?

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