Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

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Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

Post  Gary Swiech on Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:34 pm

I've had this plant since 1989. These mushrooms have been coming up since I can remember.

Does anyone know the species or name of the Mushroom? Can I move or transfer this fungus to my Korean hornbeam?

One other question. Would you carve out the hole scar left by the missing branch or leave it as is?

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Gary Swiech
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Re: Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

Post  arihato on Sat Oct 11, 2014 11:51 pm

Mycorrhizal inoculant usually consist of a number of fungi species, the one that is most compatible to your tree and soil medium will do best and fruit. It might not be the same fungus that work on Carpinus betulus as would thrive with Carpinus coreana. But there is no harm in trying to get the fungus to grow with the Cc.
In spring (repot) you can inoculate the soil medium, take some soil with mycorrhiza mycelium (the white stuff in the soil) from the Cb and get it in close contact with the roots of the Cc, deed done.

Mycorrhiza grows best if the soil is allowed to dry a bit between waterings.
You can get inoculant for Ecto-mycorrhiza and for Endo-mycorrhiza, for your Carpinus you need Ecto-mycorrhiza.

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Re: Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

Post  Gary Swiech on Sun Oct 12, 2014 12:54 am

Thanks.

I have both on hand, Ecto-mycorrhiza and for Endo-mycorrhiza. I will give the Korean hornbeam some Ecto-mycorrhiza, in the Spring.

I have located them next to each other, on the bench, in hopes the spores will travel from J to K.



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Re: Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

Post  Leo Schordje on Sun Oct 12, 2014 3:20 pm

Cool mushrooms, good tree.

To ID the mushrooms you need a good close up of the underside of the cap, this is the spore producing surface, and the details will determine the species. If is has gills, are they attached to the stem? or do they terminate by attaching back into the cap? Are there pores instead of gills? and the list of question goes on. A spore print is easy to do and is a necessary task to narrow down choices when trying to identify mushrooms.

There are at least 50 or more species from at least 20 different genera that are capable of serving as mycorrhiza native to Wisconsin, USA, plus a number of introduced mycorhizal fungi that hitch hiked in with plants raised elsewhere in the country. So getting an exact ID may be tricky.

The University of Wisconsin Extension Service has publications and other resources, check their website. PDFs of the articles are free, and downloadable from the store. http://learningstore.uwex.edu/Default.aspx

Professor Tom Volk at UW-Madison is a mycologist and often appears on radio and other forums talking about mushrooms, his Fungi of the Day photos, from 1995 to 2010 are a huge library of mushroom info specific for Wisconsin. He may not be still active, but his website is still up. (he had a heart transplant in 2006). http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/

You have a very healthy tree, and have been very consistent in your care for it or you would have lost the mycorhiza somewhere over the years, well done.

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Re: Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

Post  Gary Swiech on Sun Oct 12, 2014 5:04 pm

Thanks for all the information Leo.

I've found the The University of Wisconsin Extension Service to be of great help over the years.

I went to Professor Volk's website and will look through it, especially Fungi of the Day photos, from 1995 to 2010.

Thanks again.


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Re: Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

Post  Gary Swiech on Sun Oct 12, 2014 5:07 pm

I think I found it. Monotropa Amanita.

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Re: Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

Post  JudyB on Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:06 pm

Very nice, bet it colors up beautifully. Cool shrooms, in answer to your question, I'd carve it, as it's unlikely to heal over completely.
It's in a nice spot to look like a well placed uro anyway. But then I'd change the front angle slightly one way or the other, so it's not so straight on to the viewer.
Glad this one made it thru your horrible winter! Are you ready for this coming one?

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Re: Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

Post  Gary Swiech on Mon Oct 13, 2014 5:21 pm

I'm ready for the Winter Judy. I think.

If is has gills, are they attached to the stem? or do they terminate by attaching back into the cap?

The gills don't attach to the stem.

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Re: Japanese Hornbeam with Mushrooms

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