Urban yamadori crisis!!

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Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  Seth Ellwood on Fri Oct 09, 2009 9:19 pm

Like the topic says .I have a small chrisis.I was at one of my local frequents today and was advised they are going to be ripping out all of their landscape in the next two months or so and replant! I was able to talk them in to waiting till nov to let a few trees I purchased from them to go dormant b4 digging one of wich is a hop hornbeam with a trunk of about ooh 12"IN DIAMETER affraid affraid . And a japanese black pine with a trunk diameter of ooh 8" IN DIAMETER affraid affraid . My problem is not the hornbeam as soon as the leaves fall off I will be collecting it but the chrisis is the jbp. Should I collect it now and give it enough time to reciver b4 winter or wait till nov and collect it when everything els is dormant . If I had not come today they were going to go get a backhoe and dig them up this weekend No

Seth Ellwood
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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  Seth Ellwood on Fri Oct 09, 2009 11:04 pm

21 people have looked and no one as an opinion?? jim ,kev ,john, rob, anyone have any experience collecting jbp this time of year? I guess either way It will have to be done or the tree will go in to the compost heap .I just dont know if collecting it sooner than later will give the tree a better chance of survival.Here in sc we don't have any real wintery weather untill late december earily january sometimes earily febuary so it will have at least 2 months b4 any real issues.Today it was 90f.Technically it is fall but I would think of it more as late summer.

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  Guest on Fri Oct 09, 2009 11:40 pm

All pines as far as I know are only dormant at very low temperatures. What season are you in at the moment? If this years candles have hardened off, its probably ok to do now, as long as it has a large rootball. what's the soil like, a clay type is good, sand is bad.

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  JimLewis on Fri Oct 09, 2009 11:41 pm

I have no experience with Black pines, so can't help there.

HOWEVER, I do have experience with hophornbeam, and I'll be very surprised if you can dig up one with a 12 inch trunk without heavy equipment. That is a fully mature, BIG hophornbeam. They do not take well to severe and sudden root pruning, so I'd guess you'd need a rootball of 800 lbs, or so. Maybe more like 1000lbs.

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  JLudlam on Sat Oct 10, 2009 2:09 am

I can say that I have never delt with jpks either but I do know that if you were to get it now that you would have to get as many of the surronding roots as possible along with the soil that it is thriving in now (without damaging the feeders) as Jim said, with a trunk that size the best way is a backhoe (not the manual one) and a trailer and place it in the ground at your house. Kind of the same way that us backwood country folks lanscape our yards except we do it with the manual backhoe and the whole family What a Face

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  Seth Ellwood on Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:17 am

the hop hornbeam is a sumo style not your average "tree" it was a multi trunk that I pruned back 2 years ago due to it taking over the back porch of the business and the wounds healed fully(gota love the ground) Then this spring I trimmed it back again and it grew very well and put out tons of back buds. I should be able to shovel and mattox (pick axe) it out with no problem 9 years ago it was a nursery tree planted in the ground. The black pine is growing in black soil with a mix of clay it to was a nursery plant 9 years ago and is very tall approx 10 ft but has awesome taper I hope it survives. OOh by the way we have a ditch witch (small backhoe )on site if needed. I think the hornbeam will be going in the largest plastic concrete mixing tub I can find (approx 3 ft by 2.5 ft and 18"deep) and the jbp will be going in the same or a 25 gallon nursery container. by the way the trunk at the nebari is approx 12" mabye a little less but tapers up to 2" in approx 18 to 20"of height on the hornbeam.After I collect them I will take pics .I was like a kid at christmas when these were offered to me at a very nominal fee and they were going to pitch them in a dumpster due to re landscaping the whole building.So I figured I would try to keep them alive at least they have a chance .

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  Seth Ellwood on Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:25 am

Will ,we are currently in autumn at the moment although today felt like summer . The lows are starting to drop in to the mid 50's to high 40's next friday they are calling for high 30's.We are still a month away from when I will have to remove the trees approx first 2 weeks of november and the deciduous trees will be defoliated and dormant.But if the pine would be better suited to be collected sooner then I have that option aswell.I just dont want to risk collecting to soon with in the short timeframe I currently have. This years candels and needles are fully hardened off on this pine .

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  Kev Bailey on Sat Oct 10, 2009 10:58 am

Both sound great and I hope you manage to lift them succesfully.

I didn't respond earlier as I only have experience of Japanese hop-hornbeam - Ostrya japonica from seed. I've grown these for ten years and they respond well to spring repotting. Unfortunately I've never lifted a ground planted specimen. Perhaps it is time I planted one out!

I've got a cork barked J Black Pine planted in the ground but it is still a few years away from lifting. From instinct I would advise you to leave both as late as possible. Lift and then protect from frost over winter.

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  Seth Ellwood on Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:06 pm

I believe your right I am going to wait till the last possible day to lift .I will have plenty of help and a small backhoe although I don't think it will be needed.these are going to be the last ones out of the ground.

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about your different posts

Post  Ruppa and Sujay Shah on Wed Dec 16, 2009 10:02 am

Hi Seth
Great!
thank you for sharing!
you too have good trees. and collecting material and training . looks very Impressive.
we visited South Carolina in july09 after we attended WBC convention at Puertorico.
My Aunty stays there. Next time when i come we will like meet you
regards
ruppa

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  JimLewis on Wed Dec 16, 2009 1:26 pm

Donme a bit of research on the hophornbeam. Even if you cut it back it still will have a HUGE root system from the "old" days. It also will have a taproot that goes DOWN a long way, and probably is as big around as the trunk.

Personally, I wouldn't touch it. But you will need a backhoe and a chainsaw. and a power lift.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

Post  Seth Ellwood on Thu Dec 17, 2009 3:22 am

Ruppa not a problem would love to meet you and share my collection and the landscape with you.

Jim the tree is in my new thread it ended up being a japanese hornbeam and it is currently in my back yard in a 2 foot by 4 foot traning pot see my other thread for aditional info .

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Re: Urban yamadori crisis!!

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