Cotoneaster

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Cotoneaster

Post  Dalton Duffett on Wed Dec 18, 2013 3:55 am

My girlfriend bought me this Cotoneaster for my birthday today, and I was wondering what kind it was.

What should I do with it? I was thinking either chop the trunk before the bend and make it a small shohin, or grow it out into a cascade.

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  arihato on Wed Dec 18, 2013 1:09 pm

What would you like it to be, what is your dream image for this tree.

I grow ShoHin, so I would cut low. I go for optimal taper, best trunk line (if any).

You have a nice Nebari (root flare), two straight branches with no movement and taper. I would plant it in a bigger container and cut back the straight branches to a life bud/twig and grow new twigs with some movement.

Others may want to cut a bit higher.

You could wire the thick right-hand branch and twist it upright, don't bend it it will most likely break, twist it up (if it breaks go to option one)

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  Dalton Duffett on Wed Dec 18, 2013 2:02 pm

I was thinking something along the lines of this. Is this even a realistic goal? One other thing, can it live inside if I put it on a humidity tray and near a window?

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  JimLewis on Wed Dec 18, 2013 2:04 pm

a.  There are 10-20 years put into that little tree.

Maybe you could get this in 4-5 years:



b.  Absolutely not.  These are outdoor  plants -- 100%

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  Dalton Duffett on Wed Dec 18, 2013 2:08 pm

Well I read that cotoneasters are zone 4-6, and I'm borderline zone 6, almost 7, and we are having a cold winter this year.

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  Dalton Duffett on Wed Dec 18, 2013 2:15 pm

I know that all good bonsai take time, so I'm not too worried about that. I just don't know if I should wire that side branch down, straight, up, or just lop it off. I'd be happy either way.

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  AlainK on Wed Dec 18, 2013 5:40 pm

Wow! Never tought it could get so cold in Missouri....  Shocked 

Anyway, your Cotoneaster looks like a C. horizontalis on the whole, but it could be a cultivar, or a Cotoneaster dammeri 'Skogholm' a creeping form of Coto with slighter smaller leaves that remain longer in Autumn, and have less spectacular colours than C. h.).

Whatever, I'd chop it off where I put the red cross (Tchack!)



Wintering: I live in zone 8, but now I protect the roots of my Cotos: I put them in a sheltered corner of my garden (little wind), on a bead of dried leaves; I have 2 "adult" Zelkova serrata in the ground, 3+ and 10 meters high, I'm lucky I can use the dried leaves bvecause I'ne never seen a pest ior a disease on them. I add more leaves on the top of the soil, then a layer of pine bark (5-7 cm) on top of that, to the first branches.

This is enough for where I live, and I think sthg similar would be fine where you are.

BUT: the ones that have been repotted recently (by that I mean 6-9 months) must be protected from deep or long frosts. I speak out of experience  Rolling Eyes 

You're young: there's a lot to learn from a Cotoneaster, and you will have plenty of time to make it a stunner  Wink 

Be patient. Keeep it alive.

...And cut off that looooooong, boring branch  Laughing

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  Dalton Duffett on Wed Dec 18, 2013 6:04 pm

Thanks for the help! I'll load it up with pine bark and if it gets in the single digits like it did at the beginning of December (-15 degrees Celsius), I'll put it in the garage at night

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  AlainK on Wed Dec 18, 2013 8:14 pm

Dalton Duffett wrote:(-15 degrees Celsius)

Ooch!

Very harsh Autumn you've got there, brrrr...

You know, it's like when you have wine to keep: the fewer hicups in temperatures, the better it is. Rather than an ideal temperature, avoiding thermal shocks is the right thing to do.

Well, good luck with this lil' one: as I said before, keep it alive and you will learn a lot from it Wink

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  JimLewis on Wed Dec 18, 2013 10:58 pm

When you cut that branch, they root VERY easily as cuttings -- tho this is not the best time to start a cutting.

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  Dalton Duffett on Wed Dec 18, 2013 11:00 pm

JimLewis wrote:When you cut that branch, they root VERY easily as cuttings -- tho this is not the best time to start a cutting.
I wasn't planning on cutting until spring anyway

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  Dalton Duffett on Thu Dec 19, 2013 12:20 am

Dalton Duffett wrote:Well I read that cotoneasters are zone 4-6, and I'm borderline zone 6, almost 7, and we are having a cold winter this year.
I just realized I had it backwards. I'm in zone 6 almost 5, and Cotoneasters grow in 6-9. Sorry if I confused you.

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  Dalton Duffett on Tue Dec 24, 2013 5:34 am

UPDATE: Now it's even colder and I don't know what to do. The night temperatures are around -7F (-22C) and the day temperatures are around 25F (-4C) which is much too cold for Cotoneasters. Not only that, but January is going to be even colder! I bring it inside at night and bury it to the first branch with Pine Bark during the day, but it's starting to shed leaves. I don't know if that's normal, but I got it with leaves, so I'm assuming that that's bad. Is it dying or is that normal, and how can I save/help it? I would really like to keep it.

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Re: Cotoneaster

Post  AlainK on Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:10 pm

Most cotoneaster are deciduous. Some, like C. microphillus are semi-deciduous: according to the climate they keep or shed their leaves in the winter.

But yes, -22° C is probably much too cold if it can't be put in a greenhouse, or under a frame.

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Re: Cotoneaster

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