A few issues with a Texas Ebony

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A few issues with a Texas Ebony

Post  CSBudzi on Wed Sep 25, 2013 7:26 am

Good day everyone,

My wife and I have been learning for just 2 and a half years now. And we have been making plenty of mistakes along the way.
My wife has a great little texas ebony. We repotted it about 10-14 days ago. We really should have repotted in the spring I know. But we were not able to then. It was getting pretty root bound in its pot so I thought I'd best do it now instead of waiting till next year. Was that a terrible idea?
When I repotted I left some of the original soil, so as to not bare root it. I trimmed the tap roots and left just about all the feeder roots. There were quite a bit tap roots that i trimmed back, but plenty of feeder roots. I used turface with pine park compost. I'd say 25%-30% pine bark to Turface.
I'm in the Chicago Area. The weather has been steady 70's with a few days in the 80's and a few in the high 60's. The nights have been dipping into the 50's so the last few nights I've been bringing the tree inside for the night.
After about 2 days from the repotting the tree began to drop some leaves and turn yellow. I bought some superthrive (I know superthrive is controversial on whether it works or not but I'll try anything to keep this guy alive) and KLN rooting concentrate,  used the recommended doses and also sprinkled Myconox on the soil about 6 days ago.
The tree has not improved.Though the yellowing has slowed down a bit.
My wife and I let the tree grow freely all year and has 2 sacrificial branches going to try and thicken a few other parts of the tree. I believe I have read that when you trim the roots you should trim an appropriate amount of the branches/canopy as well. I was not sure if there is fact in that or if it is just opinion.
I have not trimmed any of the tree  because I figured the transplant was shock enough, why should i go chopping off limbs as well?
I don't believe this is a pest or a fungus/disease. But I do have a copper and Pyrethrin spray that I did spray the plant with just in case.
I guess so sum things up. Should I trim back some of the tree since I trimmed up the roots? Like these sacrificial branches I had?
Is there any other suggestions to help the tree thrive? Solutions or potions to use? 0/10/10 fertilizer?
Also since I missed the prime opportunities repot  the tree. Should i have waited till the spring even though the tree was getting root bound?
Please pardon my ignorance, I've read a lot of things but its been hard differentiating opinion and facts. Thank you for reading and any suggestions.
Pictures below. Note that Texas ebony folds up it's leaves at night. And these pictures were taken at night inside my home.






CSBudzi
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Re: A few issues with a Texas Ebony

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Wed Sep 25, 2013 1:14 pm

CsBudzi,

When you repot, the plant normally needs a week of bright light, and then is introduced to sunlight slowly.

With the Texas ebony you should not need the various liquids/substances you have added. A month of growing before offering 1/3 to 1/4 strength fertiliser into moist soil, once a week, if the plant needs it. It will go slow or dormant with cold, it is from Texas, Texas will go cold.

You may have removed too much of the roots [ for feeding the tree ] and the leaf drop may be a response.

Watch your watering. If you have observed the soil for the last two years, this should be no problem.
Best of luck.
Khaimraj

* Grower of a Texas Ebony since 1980 or so.

Khaimraj Seepersad
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Re: A few issues with a Texas Ebony

Post  JimLewis on Wed Sep 25, 2013 1:19 pm

I haven't had a Texas ebony for several years now, but yes, I think it would have been a lot better if you had waited until spring. Trees do NOT die from being rootbound.

And, throwing chemicals at it indiscriminately probably hasn't helped, either, while the tree was trying to recuperate from the damage. Neither the Superthrive nor the KLN would have hurt alone, but who knows what might happen together? Add the copper fungicide and you add insult to injury. The Myconox won't hurt, but likely won't do anything, either.

ALL trees react when roots are cut. It takes time -- more than two weeks -- to recover, especially when the work was done off season. Add to the fact that it is Fall and you are growing it far north of where the tree normally grows (even indoors) and you should expect it to have yellow leaves. It likely will lose all of its leaves (mine did every winter after being brought indoors, even in Florida), but if you don't mistreat it any more it likely will survive. They're tough trees.

It will need MUCH LESS water from now to spring, so don't let the soil stay wet; just barely damp would be best. They are dry land plants and don't like wet feet at any time of year. And don't add any more chemicals.

Good luck.

And ask for advice first next time.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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