Moringa oleifera, anyone?

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Moringa oleifera, anyone?

Post  redbeard on Wed May 29, 2013 10:09 pm


Moringa oleifera is a lovely tree, quick-growing with fine foliage; has anyone had any experience with it as a bonsai specimen?
[Just to be clear, I'm not asking whether it is, in anyone's well-esteemed opinion, an "appropriate" species for bonsai; I shall make that determination myself, TYVM.]

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Re: Moringa oleifera, anyone?

Post  JimLewis on Wed May 29, 2013 11:35 pm

Well, it's kinda funny looking in that picture. It seems to prefer arid lands, so I wonder how it would do in Ky. And it prefers warmer climes than yours, though I assume you can take care of that problem.

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Re: Moringa oleifera, anyone?

Post  Nigel Parke on Wed May 29, 2013 11:39 pm

Redbeard,

It is a tree that I have considered as a potential subject for bonsai. It has a lot of features that are pleasing to me - beautiful flowers, fairly quick growth, though the leaves are pinnate, the actual leaflets are quite small and suitable for bonsai. So far on my side though I've seen established trees none are suitable for collection...WAY TOO BIG for me to remove much less care for, so it will have to be grown from seeds or seedlings.

My two-cents is to go for it!! I have no experience growing it as a bonsai but if your climate will allow for it to thrive then you should not have a difficulty in having a decent bonsai in a few years time during which you can learn its habits etc.

Nigel

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Re: Moringa oleifera, anyone?

Post  redbeard on Thu May 30, 2013 1:10 am

JimLewis wrote:Well, it's kinda funny looking in that picture. It seems to prefer arid lands, so I wonder how it would do in Ky. And it prefers warmer climes than yours, though I assume you can take care of that problem.
Yeah, climate is not ideal, but I have space to bring things indoors over the winter. I have all sorts of arid-land specimens, they manage to get by with the clumsy care I give them.
Nigel Parke wrote:...so it will have to be grown from seeds or seedlings.
Indeed; I collected some seed from a tree down in the FL Keys last year, started them in pots and brought them in over the winter. The above-soil parts withered away and I thought they were dead --until I emptied the pots and found what looked like small stubby tan-colored carrots. These roots are now sprouting nicely and I hope they'll survive this season as well as the coming Winter. One habit I have learned already- they appear to be just fine with ZERO watering throughout the Winter.


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Re: Moringa oleifera, anyone?

Post  Andre Beaurain on Thu May 30, 2013 8:31 am

Howzit guys.

Moringa is a species that are being grown much more lately.

The leaves has incredible properties, vitamines ect. You can cook it like spinach, and use it for meals and many remedies. Ii is now sold all over Africa for medicine against Aids. To boost the immune system, it does NOT cure Aids! We stock them in Our nursery for this purpose. I dont sell it to the normal plant shopper.

One find it often near the house of a Shangoma or Witch doctor.

In Namibie they are called Fairytail trees. In Madagscar, which has two varieties: Moringa drouhardii and Moringa hildebrandtii are called Drumsticks.

Here are some in my Garden. The big one at the back was planted one year before the other two small ones (sticks ) in the front. ( I did this to see if it will survive the Winter rain, which it did) All of them are the same age, See what ONE year does to it in the Ground....hyper speed growing!!

As you can see the leaves get enourmous with sparse foliage on looong internodes.... I doubt if it can be bonsai'd the leaves are just tooo big.

If you want ot try, the same conditions as for Baobab will apply, as this is also a Succulent tree.


They are very very fast growing in the ground. In pots they take much much longer.



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Re: Moringa oleifera, anyone?

Post  redbeard on Thu May 30, 2013 12:42 pm

I know what you mean with regard to the difference in growth rates as a function of ground-vs-pot culture. My two potted specimens are just tiny little nubbits; one that I grew outdoors in Arizona some years ago was several-score times the size of these even at a much younger age.

thanks for the picture; what a lovely place!

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Re: Moringa oleifera, anyone?

Post  adam1234 on Thu May 30, 2013 11:05 pm

Andre Beaurain wrote:
One find it often near the house of a Shangoma or Witch doctor.

Poisonous fruit, snakes and now Shangomas Shocked . What next Andre should I be watching for when I'm in the African bush? Very Happy
Cheers for the lovely description and insight into Africa, you paint the african land so beautifully.

Adam

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