Misting house?

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Misting house?

Post  Mitch Thomas on Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:13 am

Hello everyone!
I'm thinking of setting up a misting house to use on collected local pines, loblollyand slash. I will be using a horticultural heat pad to warm the roots.

My question is how long and how often should I set the misters to operate?
Anybody have any ideas?

Mitch

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Re: Misting house?

Post  JimLewis on Tue Feb 26, 2013 1:37 pm

I can't answer your question, but I'd be real concerned that misting in an enclosure would keep the soil wet and soggy. The slash pine might not mind, but the loblolly would.

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Re: Misting house?

Post  Mitch Thomas on Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:03 pm

Jim
Thanks for your reply, after doing some reasearch, I have found Misting is more benificial for junipers than pines.
It is done to keep moisture in the foliage while the roots recover afer collecting, But I am still unsure of the frequency and duration. I may going to collect some ash junipers later this month.

Thanks
Mitch

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Re: Misting house?

Post  bwaynef on Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:19 pm

JimLewis wrote:I can't answer your question, but I'd be real concerned that misting in an enclosure would keep the soil wet and soggy. The slash pine might not mind, but the loblolly would.

According to the wikipedia entry for Loblolly Pine, they reference the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language's definition of the word Loblolly:
The word loblolly means "low, wet place
(though they go on to say that they don't ONLY grow in such conditions.)

My experience with them is that they ARE thirsty trees, but I've never kept them in wet nor soggy soil.


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Re: Misting house?

Post  JimLewis on Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:55 pm

Loblolly pines are pioneer species. After grasses, they are among the first trees to appear on an abandoned field (along with sumac and a few others).

My Webster's 10th also notes the word's reference to a low, muddy location (it also means an unpalatable gruel!), but in my many years of slogging in Florida's woods and swamps, I can't recall ever seeing one growing with wet feet. That's usually reserved for the spruce pine -- and, of course, the slash pine which can grow in standing water.

That doesn't mean they can't and don't grow in those locations, of course. It also bears no relationship to trying to grow one in a pot with soggy soil.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Misting house?

Post  Zach Smith on Wed Feb 27, 2013 11:22 am

I see loblollies in shallow swamps here in Louisiana all the time (it's easier to see them in winter, and you tend to do a double-take). I don't believe they'll stand in relatively deep water, though, haven't seen any in that type of scenario.

Zach

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Re: Misting house?

Post  Just Mike on Wed Feb 27, 2013 3:58 pm

this is just my opinion, but i would think a misting house for any pine species would bring the possibility of more harm than good...isnt your climate pretty humid already anyway? maybe im missing something because i have no experience with those specific species.

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