rusty blackhaw

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rusty blackhaw

Post  bucknbonsai on Fri Feb 22, 2013 9:39 pm

has anyone tried this species. The bark is amazing and the fall color is great and the blooms and berries are nice. My property and friends property is covered with them, some very large with great movement. Ive had little luck finding any images on google of bonsai ones. I have read on general gardening forums that because it suckers off the roots that any root or top growth disturbance can trigger more suckers but I guess these could keep being cut off? is the suckering characteristic a sign that it may handle transplant stress well?

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Re: rusty blackhaw

Post  Russell Coker on Fri Feb 22, 2013 10:02 pm



I've seen some real beauties on a friend's property around Columbus, MS, and thought the same thing. Dig up a few and give it a shot.

Like you, I think they have amazing potential. As for the rest, I have no idea.

R


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Re: rusty blackhaw

Post  Just Mike on Fri Feb 22, 2013 10:32 pm

rusty blackhaw is part of the viburnum family, and viburnums have been used as bonsai before...with that being said, they arent the most popular for whatever reason (as in, you dont see a lot of them)...but, as bonsai grows in america and europe, we are seeing more and more native species that arent "traditional" being used with great success...

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Re: rusty blackhaw

Post  bucknbonsai on Fri Feb 22, 2013 10:40 pm

I think they would work from an attractive standpoint and I have trunk chopped ones in my pasture and they backbud great. My only concern is their ability to be transplanted, i have read somewhere they may be hard to transplant in terms of as a landscaping plant, but then again Ive also read that about American hornbeams in the landscape yet it does just fine being transplanted for me in bonsai culture. The size of the one I plan to dig is >8" diameter at base and roots extend into a surrounding limestone seam so it will be a 1/2 day type project to dig it so just curious if anyone has ever dug one or transplanted one even as just a landscaping plant and any feedback they had on that process. I dont have enough knowledge to assume that feedback on any viburnum species would apply to this particular one or not.

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Rusty Blackhaw

Post  bonsaisr on Fri Feb 22, 2013 11:06 pm

Go here, page 3.
http://www.longislandbonsai.org/newsletters/Newsletter_July_2012.pdf
Iris

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Re: rusty blackhaw

Post  Auballagh on Sat Feb 23, 2013 2:40 am

A Black Haw, (Viburnum prunifolium) won as Best-In-Show Bonsai tree for our annual show with the Virginia Bonsai Society this past year in spring, 2012. This event was judged by our guest artist, Ms. Pauline Muth, and I saw that she was quite impressed by this unusual Bonsai tree. If you have found one with a trunk that is 8 inches in diameter at the base, it sounds like you have the potential for an extremely good, wild-collected/yamadori bonsai. Cool
I too, am currently raising one of these deciduous trees species out as a pre-bonsai. Mine was started out 3 years ago as a tiny seedling, and has a lot of in-ground growing ahead of it, before it will amount to much. So, I don't know how - or what - techniques to suggest in lifting yours from the ground. I personally would keep a close eye on the tree, and when the leaf buds first begin to swell sometime this spring- that SHOULD be an optimum time to safely collect it.
Good luck with with your tree. And please share with some future photos what you collect and wind up doing to develop this Black Haw tree. With careful work and dedication, I've personally seen that this species can be developed into really nice Bonsai. Cool

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Re: rusty blackhaw

Post  Zach Smith on Mon Feb 25, 2013 11:18 am

bucknbonsai wrote:has anyone tried this species. The bark is amazing and the fall color is great and the blooms and berries are nice. My property and friends property is covered with them, some very large with great movement. Ive had little luck finding any images on google of bonsai ones. I have read on general gardening forums that because it suckers off the roots that any root or top growth disturbance can trigger more suckers but I guess these could keep being cut off? is the suckering characteristic a sign that it may handle transplant stress well?

I grew the species about 20 years ago, and found it to be delightful. The emergent leaf color is stunning, and the furrowed bark is very nice. They take to pot culture easily. I wouldn't worry about the suckers too much, just remove them. Like growing crape myrtle or privet, it's the price you pay.

Zach

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Re: rusty blackhaw

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