Tropical bonsai in cold climates

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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Fri Jan 04, 2013 2:10 pm

Chris,

hope this helps. Buttonwood. Images shot today.9.30 p.m.
If you need close-ups let me know. I tried to knock off the sharp contrast of early morning light.

Hopefully you can see the no new growth.
Khaimraj

Both are small efforts. The first is something someone got fed-up of growing and gave to me. About 23 years old.




This one I grew from a seed and is about 20 years or so old. I am really after the mature bark of this tree, not the driftwood effect.


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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  Twisted Trees on Sat Jan 05, 2013 6:41 pm

coh wrote:"why do people in the northeast grow tropical bonsai?"

This is one reason why I grow tropicals in the northeast. I've had this Bougie for about 20 years.

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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  coh on Sat Jan 05, 2013 8:58 pm

Twisted Trees wrote:
coh wrote:"why do people in the northeast grow tropical bonsai?"

This is one reason why I grow tropicals in the northeast. I've had this Bougie for about 20 years.

That's a nice tree, is it a current photo or from the summer? I know you mentioned to me via PM that you had other tropicals as well, would you be willing to share some of your experience here? How well they do (or don't do) during the winter, which species you grow, etc?

Khaimraj Seepersad wrote:Chris,

hope this helps. Buttonwood. Images shot today.9.30 p.m.
If you need close-ups let me know. I tried to knock off the sharp contrast of early morning light.

Hopefully you can see the no new growth.
Khaimraj
Thanks Khaimraj. Interestingly, my buttonwood is one of the tropicals that is doing pretty well. It is still growing (though slowing down), leaves look very healthy for the most part.

Jerry Meislik wrote:Chris,
My approach to your growing situation would be to keep the plant area much warmer. I would try to hold your night temperatures above 65-68F.
I would also make sure that the metal halide light is not getting your plants too hot. Leave a thermometer at the top of the foliage height. Keep temperatures below 95F or the plants may suffer.
Humidity is definitely helpful and making some sort of enclosure will help keep humidity levels higher and your plants will be healthier.
However of all the factors that you could modify this one is to my mind the least critical. If you have good light and the proper temperatures I think you will be pleasantly surprised.
Let us know how it goes.
Jerry

Jerry, thanks very much for your suggestions. I am going to work on keeping the temperatures up more at night (interestingly, I'll note that our summer nights often drop below 65 here). I'm probably going to build an enclosure to hold in the heat and also a bit more humidity. Will see how that does. I think I've got the plants far enough from the bulbs, there's no evidence of foliage damage on the higher parts of the taller trees. A thermometer in that area reads 90 or below.

Sam Ogranaja wrote:Hey Chris,

Ryan mentioned that his trees receive only artificial light. That may be the difference and therefore the issue we're experiencing. We're bringing our plants out and then bringing them inside for the winter. No matter what light we use while indoors (which I use no supplemental light) they'll still experience a change in light intensity at a minimum among many other factors. What do you think? Does this make sense?

Have a great weekend!!!!
Sam

It's quite possible that the trees might do better overall if they were kept indoors under artificial light all the time. I think that's what Jerry does with his ficus bonsai? The twice yearly shifting may be inducing more stress on the trees than we realize. However, I have no interest in maintaining an indoor growing area during the summer, at least at this time. And a move to the tropics is not in the cards!

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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  Ryan on Sat Jan 05, 2013 9:06 pm

coh wrote:
It's quite possible that the trees might do better overall if they were kept indoors under artificial light all the time. I think that's what Jerry does with his ficus bonsai? The twice yearly shifting may be inducing more stress on the trees than we realize. However, I have no interest in maintaining an indoor growing area during the summer, at least at this time. And a move to the tropics is not in the cards!


I think that is what Jerry does. If I recall correctly, where he lives there is always a chance of frost any day of the year. He grows under big metal halides.

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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  Lost2301 on Mon Jan 07, 2013 9:05 am

I have mentioned this before on this board, try using a heating mat under your tropicals. Last winter I had Lantana, Satinwood/Jasmine, Texas Ebony, Lavendar Star blooming all winter. My buttonwoods grew all winter. My large Black Olive basically had no leaves on it in the fall. I grew the tree out in the winter for our spring show. It had so many leaves on the top I had to add supplemental lighting to the bottom of the tree. I am using T5 Full Spectrum lights to. As of today, the Lantana and Jasmine are blooming. The Texas Ebony has flower buds everywhere. The Lavendar Star is having problems and I have been cutting off the buds so it does not flower.

I tried the heating pads/lights on the right side of my plant room and everything was growing good. So I set up the left side to. My electric bill also dropped from $144 to $100 a month. Lights run from 6am to 11pm.

Here are some photo's of the black olive growing last winter

12/24/2011


02/23/2012


04/06/2012


05/11/2012


Here is the tree at our show in June, 2012:


Here is what I use during the winter. I also use them in the garage for Black Pines etc. I have trees in the garage that are frozen solid, except for the ones on the pads. They keep every thing 15 degrees warmer then the surrounding air. My plant room runs around 75 - 63 high low for the day. My furnace is turned down to 50 during the night time.

[img][/img]Heating Pad

The only problem with these pads is the fact the tree dries out quicker, wchich is not to bad a problem.

Mike



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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  Twisted Trees on Mon Jan 07, 2013 5:18 pm

[quote="coh"]
Twisted Trees wrote:
coh wrote:"why do people in the northeast grow tropical bonsai?"

That's a nice tree, is it a current photo or from the summer? I know you mentioned to me via PM that you had other tropicals as well, would you be willing to share some of your experience here? How well they do (or don't do) during the winter, which species you grow, etc?
That photo was from the late summer but was it's current look until last week when I defoliated it and did some refinements to the branching. My Bouganvillias always have some leaf drop when brought in for the winter. More often than not I defoliate them early on. They will start to grow again about this time of year and sometimes blossom. Come spring I defoliate them again because the winter leaves are to big and I don't want to go through the bother of reaclimating the leaves to full sun.

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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  coh on Wed Jan 09, 2013 3:37 pm

Lost2301 wrote:I have mentioned this before on this board, try using a heating mat under your tropicals. Last winter I had Lantana, Satinwood/Jasmine, Texas Ebony, Lavendar Star blooming all winter. My buttonwoods grew all winter. My large Black Olive basically had no leaves on it in the fall. I grew the tree out in the winter for our spring show. It had so many leaves on the top I had to add supplemental lighting to the bottom of the tree. I am using T5 Full Spectrum lights to. As of today, the Lantana and Jasmine are blooming. The Texas Ebony has flower buds everywhere. The Lavendar Star is having problems and I have been cutting off the buds so it does not flower.

I tried the heating pads/lights on the right side of my plant room and everything was growing good. So I set up the left side to. My electric bill also dropped from $144 to $100 a month. Lights run from 6am to 11pm.
.
.
.
Here is what I use during the winter. I also use them in the garage for Black Pines etc. I have trees in the garage that are frozen solid, except for the ones on the pads. They keep every thing 15 degrees warmer then the surrounding air. My plant room runs around 75 - 63 high low for the day. My furnace is turned down to 50 during the night time.

The only problem with these pads is the fact the tree dries out quicker, wchich is not to bad a problem.

Mike

Thanks Mike...I do have a heating mat. What I've done after reading the various responses is build a "Ryan-type" enclosure (trademark symbol needed) around my grow area, using PVC and plastic. I'm hoping this will allow me to keep the temperature up at night (without having to heat the whole room) and also keep the humidity higher. I'll eventually post about my results...for now I have to figure out how to maintain the temperature in the desired range. The heating pad(s) will be part of the solution.

Curious about the grewia, what kind of problems are you having? Mine appears to be in a slow but steady decline. After a strong burst of growth last winter, it's been struggling...puts out small amounts of growth, but the leaves rapidly turn yellow and drop. It has flowered prolifically but I cannot seem to get it to put on any size. Repotted recently and the roots looked OK so I am at a loss.

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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  Ryan on Wed Jan 09, 2013 3:55 pm

coh wrote:
What I've done after reading the various responses is build a "Ryan-type" enclosure (trademark symbol needed)


Laughing Laughing Good luck!

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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

Post  Lost2301 on Thu Jan 10, 2013 6:32 am

coh wrote:
Lost2301 wrote:I have mentioned this before on this board, try using a heating mat under your tropicals. Last winter I had Lantana, Satinwood/Jasmine, Texas Ebony, Lavendar Star blooming all winter. My buttonwoods grew all winter. My large Black Olive basically had no leaves on it in the fall. I grew the tree out in the winter for our spring show. It had so many leaves on the top I had to add supplemental lighting to the bottom of the tree. I am using T5 Full Spectrum lights to. As of today, the Lantana and Jasmine are blooming. The Texas Ebony has flower buds everywhere. The Lavendar Star is having problems and I have been cutting off the buds so it does not flower.

I tried the heating pads/lights on the right side of my plant room and everything was growing good. So I set up the left side to. My electric bill also dropped from $144 to $100 a month. Lights run from 6am to 11pm.
.
.
.
Here is what I use during the winter. I also use them in the garage for Black Pines etc. I have trees in the garage that are frozen solid, except for the ones on the pads. They keep every thing 15 degrees warmer then the surrounding air. My plant room runs around 75 - 63 high low for the day. My furnace is turned down to 50 during the night time.

The only problem with these pads is the fact the tree dries out quicker, wchich is not to bad a problem.

Mike

Thanks Mike...I do have a heating mat. What I've done after reading the various responses is build a "Ryan-type" enclosure (trademark symbol needed) around my grow area, using PVC and plastic. I'm hoping this will allow me to keep the temperature up at night (without having to heat the whole room) and also keep the humidity higher. I'll eventually post about my results...for now I have to figure out how to maintain the temperature in the desired range. The heating pad(s) will be part of the solution.

Curious about the grewia, what kind of problems are you having? Mine appears to be in a slow but steady decline. After a strong burst of growth last winter, it's been struggling...puts out small amounts of growth, but the leaves rapidly turn yellow and drop. It has flowered prolifically but I cannot seem to get it to put on any size. Repotted recently and the roots looked OK so I am at a loss.

Hi Crhis,

I have two grewia. The one I mentioned above is doing the same thing. Last winter it was growing good all winter long. The second one I have has been growing well and getting bigger all though slowly. It then started dropping leaves like the first one. I suspect spider mites are at work and have treated everything for them. It seems bugs seem to go for my grewia first and when the leaves start to yellow and drop its not good. I finally went ahead and removed all the leaves and its just starting to bud out again. The second grewia has stopped dropping leaves after treating for spider mites. The first and second year I had the grewia spider mites went after it and by spring it had no leaves left. This year I must have brought something into the house with mites on it. I know I picked up an accent plant from a green house. I found white flies to. So mites and white flies, bad boys for sure. Broke my own rule about bringing plants into house from nurseries during the went. They almost always have bugs on them.

Good luck with your grewia.

Mike

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Re: Tropical bonsai in cold climates

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