Yamadori tools?

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Yamadori tools?

Post  I Cut too much on Thu Dec 20, 2012 7:43 am

Ive Never gone on a yamadori quest. I've done plenty of study and understand the basics and feel confident in accomplishing this. However, I was wondering if anyone has some suggestions in particular about tools to bring. I was going to bring a deep shovel, a branch/root cutting tool (like a saw), and a tarp (because I drive a really nice car), and maybe some bottled water (for myself). Anything else needed? Any techniques to share?

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  JimLewis on Thu Dec 20, 2012 1:19 pm

That list seems fine, but the BEST tool to bring along -- and one that helps assure that what you collect lives -- is someone who has done it several times.

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  PaulH on Thu Dec 20, 2012 2:39 pm

A handheld pick like this is the collecting tool I use most.

[img][/img]

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Yamadori tools?

Post  ironman on Thu Dec 20, 2012 3:01 pm

...a hank of rope, hand clippers, reciprocating saw and plenty of batteries...
Make sure to bring a razor sharp folding hand saw. I like the kind which the blade cuts on both the push and the pull strokes...
Good luck.

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  Guest on Thu Dec 20, 2012 4:11 pm

I Cut too much wrote:Ive Never gone on a yamadori quest. I've done plenty of study and understand the basics and feel confident in accomplishing this. However, I was wondering if anyone has some suggestions in particular about tools to bring. I was going to bring a deep shovel, a branch/root cutting tool (like a saw), and a tarp (because I drive a really nice car), and maybe some bottled water (for myself). Anything else needed? Any techniques to share?

You can never have too many tools for the job because you never know what you'll encounter. One tool that I never leave behind is my hand powered winch. This is particulary handy if you'll be in rocky terrain or digging up LARGE trees with deep, thick roots.

My very best advice though is this ..... watch a couple of videos by Sebastijan Sandev "SandevBonsai"! His videos are so unpretentious, so entertaining, so honest and so "down to earth". He's even done a video on just your question: Yamadori tools, although his array of equipment is just a tad "over the top".

Here you go:

HUNT:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0G_mQEzeiA

HUNT:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWj4lQ8Vjzc

TOOLS:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjXZ65IXQrw

Yes, he makes mistakes but it doesn't matter. You will learn from them. You gotta' love this guy! Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy


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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  drgonzo on Thu Dec 20, 2012 4:25 pm

I have collected some pretty good sized deciduous material and I have whittled my tools down to 3.

My Rigid long handled shovel. It has a fiberglass handle that bends and creaks so I know if I'm over extending it. With Hickory or Ash handles they don't give you any fore warning if your putting too much weight on the handle, the just snap.

My DeWalt reciprocating saw with several blades (they dull up fast going in dirt) and a spare charged up battery.

My Hand pruners.

I'm pretty rough during my initial dig out, but I take a good sized chunk of soil with the tree, I then clear it up and clean up my root cuts back home.

The reason I carry so few tools is that I hike up into my property to do the work so the less to lug around the better. I also always wear a good set of rubber work gloves to help avoid poison Ivy. I usually have a jug of water for myself and if necessary for the tree.

Jay

PS even with the gloves some of my worst cases of Poison Ivy have come from collecting trees. If I'm after several trees at a time I ride up in my tractor with my wood cart to help me get them back to the house in a timely fashion.



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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  rps on Thu Dec 20, 2012 4:43 pm

JimLewis wrote:That list seems fine, but the BEST tool to bring along -- and one that helps assure that what you collect lives -- is someone who has done it several times.

jim's right here. take advantage of someone else's experience if you can.

hardware depends on the terrain you hope to harvest from. hereabouts, an extended day takes the hunters from areas of prairie silt and sand, through extended moraine and into the great precambrian shield --- each of these well pocketed with lakes and sphagnum bogs of varying sizes. for example, the crowbar [or pick] needed to [carefully, painstakingly] prise a jack pine from a crevice in the granite is dead weight chasing a bog-resident tamarack.... etc.
so, it pays to know the landscape you'll be dealing with and how the species you're after nestles into same. you said you've done your homework, so you've probably got that one beat already.
all that said, a good sharp saw is indispensable wherever you may roam.

beyond the tarp for your car's sake* & the water for yours, it's prudent to also consider the specimens' newly disturbed & exposed roots. depending on the travel time between the point of collection and their new home, you may get away with wrapping them in plastic or lodging them in a large plastic bucket --- but you may need to mist and/or douse if the trip is lengthy. aftercare varies from species to species [and my repertoire there is limited to matters local], but if you specify someone else might be able to speak from their experience with that species.
*[a tarp will catch the lumps, but it will be impossible to keep your car 'clean'. trust me.]

when are you thinking of doing this? i won't pretend to know everything on the matter, but with most species there are better times of year to harvest than others. sometimes a tree will survive anything you throw at it, so there are always anecdotal exceptions; but the probability of survival goes up when the seasons are respected. i'm sure you know that, but i throw it out in response to your request for general information & the timing of your post.
as well, your zone is altogether different from mine --- our local winter prohibition harvest is based [at least partly] on +20cms of snow and frozen ground, so doesn't really translate to gentler climes.

finally, make sure you attend to the permission & permits business. it's important.

have fun. take your time. look around.
not every tree is collectable, but they all tell a story & can provide inspiration.




Last edited by rps on Thu Dec 20, 2012 4:47 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : "you're" corrected to "your".... pity's sake!)

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  rockm on Thu Dec 20, 2012 6:33 pm

A trip that involves no digging, but an initial search for appropriate material is the first and probably most important tool in a collection tool kit.

Knowing WHERE you're going to dig and for WHAT greatly dictates what you'll need to bring to dig it up (and collectors don't really "dig" trees. "Dig" is a euphamism for "busting your butt sawing, prying, shoveling busting rock, breaking your fingernails to the quick, while keeping an eye out for snakes, coyotes, cattle, odd precipice or large ankle-busting groundhog hole."

Going out into a great unknown won't usually turn up a tree that's even worth collecting, or force you to dig something that can't survive the procedure.

This is where an experienced co-traveler is key. If they have collected before, they know where decent material is and what to bring to get it out alive.

Ig

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  I Cut too much on Thu Dec 20, 2012 7:27 pm

JimLewis wrote:That list seems fine, but the BEST tool to bring along -- and one that helps assure that what you collect lives -- is someone who has done it several times.

I would absolutely LOVE to do this with an experienced collector! I am a cautious person by nature, and never go alone into uncharted waters. However, competent bonsai enthusiasts cannot be found in my area (central Oregon near bend) The closest thing to bonsai nursery is a Chinese lady selling mallsai on the side of the road. I know she knows nothing because I stopped in and asked questions. As soon as I saw the glued down fish tank gravel I walked away.

Living where I do, I am literally surrounded by the deshutes national forest. The forest is my market.

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  rockm on Thu Dec 20, 2012 7:38 pm

Collecting trees in a national forest may be prohibited, or will require a permit. You should get the appropriate approval before you begin collecting.

Also, there is a local bonsai club in Bend. Here's a complete list of the Oregon Clubs copied from the American Bonsai Society web page:

Oregon

OREGON - Corvallis

Corvallis Bonsai Society. Meets at Chintimini Senior Center, 2601 NW Tyler Ave., fourth Tuesday, 7:00 PM. Ruth Musil. (503) 757-8261.

OREGON - Coos Bay/North Bend

Bay Area Bonsai Society. Meets at Coos Bay public library, 525 Anderson, second Monday, except July and August, 7:00 PM. George & Eva Ahuna, 1434 N Tenth Court, Coos Bay, OR 97420, (503) 269-9696 or Kenneth Windred, 3013 Pigeon Point Rd., Coos Bay, OR 97420, (503) 888-3634. Annual spring exhibit.

OREGON - Eugene

Eugene Bonsai Society, Inc. Meets at Eugene Garden Club, 1645 High St. in Eugene, first Thursday, except January, July, and August, at 6:30 PM. For more information contract: Dean Burkhart, (541) 744-1919, Email: burkhaks@aol.com. Website: www.eugenebonsai.org

OREGON - Medford

Cascade Bonsai Society. Meets the 3rd Thursday of each month at 7:00 pm at Eastwood Baptist Church Annex, 675 N. Keene Way, Medford, OR Contact: Jan Bailey (541) 857-2627 Email: bondoxies@charter.net

OREGON - Portland

The Bonsai Society of Portland. Meets on the fourth Tuesday of the month at St Phillips Neri Parish located at 2408 SE 16th Avenue, Portland. No meetingd July, August and December. Contact: Arlene Sigourney, PO Box 10615, Portland, OR 97296-0615. (503) 667-0148. Email: portlandbonsai@hotmail.com Website: www.portlandbonsai.org - BSOP is an active club, founded in 1968. Guests are welcome.

OREGON - Port Orford

Far-West Bonsai Society. Meets at Alfonso Travel Park, first Monday, 7:00 PM. DeBoyd & Eileen Smith, 95650 Sixes River Rd., Sixes, OR 97476. (503) 332-7633. Fourth of July exhibit at Driftwood School, Port Orford.

OREGON - Salem

Willamette Valley Bonsai Society. Meets at the Marion County Fire District #1, 300 Cordon Road NE,Salem, OR the second Tuesday, 7:00 PM. Contact: Ron Phair Phone: (503) 932-2165 E-mail: phairest@hotmail.com WVBS stimulate interest in, information on and appreciation of the art of bonsai by participating in fairs, exhibitions, conventions and other educational displays for members and non-members alike.Website: http://willamettevalleybonsai.org[url][/url]

[url=http://absbonsai.org/bonsai-club-directory/usa]

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  JimLewis on Thu Dec 20, 2012 7:52 pm

North Bend is nowhere near Bend. North Bend is on the coast. Bend is slapdash in the middle of the state with NOTHING else around it. Confusing, I know. I used to live in the "area."

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  Leo Schordje on Thu Dec 20, 2012 11:10 pm

If where you are planning to collect is a place you can visit several times over the coarse of a year, I would recommend a trip to scout out trees some time before you go to do the actually digging. When hunting my sister's property, I bring along plastic tape to mark trees, Crime Scene tape to be exact, but that is just my off sense of humor. Once you have identified the trees you want, it will be much easier to visualize what you will need to bring in the way of tools and supplies.

Bring a digital camera, to take before pictures, or if you don't use some physical marker like tape on the tree, use the camera to record the landmarks, so you can find the spot again.

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  rps on Thu Dec 20, 2012 11:50 pm

Leo Schordje wrote: I would recommend a trip to scout out trees some time before you go to do the actually digging.

this also allows the patient to do a little pre-dig root work --- by which i mean, exposing some roots near the trunk, cutting a few back and then covering things up again. the select root pruning should then generate feeders near the trunk, markedly increasing the odds of survival when you dig it up a growth season later.

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Re: Yamadori tools?

Post  I Cut too much on Fri Dec 21, 2012 3:14 am

JimLewis wrote:North Bend is nowhere near Bend. North Bend is on the coast. Bend is slapdash in the middle of the state with NOTHING else around it. Confusing, I know. I used to live in the "area."

^^^ what he said. Now I wouldn't mind going with somebody from the valley who decided to make a trip over here to collect along side me. I would even let said individual have any tree they find for the wealth of experience gained. (I'm getting at something here...)

Although I used to live in Newport Oregon and that is my next place to collect since there are so many juniper on the oceans cliffs. Gonna be dangerous, but danger is my first, second, and last name. Lol

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