a very different Bougainsai

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a very different Bougainsai

Post  eddieperth on Mon Nov 26, 2012 12:23 pm

Hello all!

I'm new to the IBC and new to bonsai. I've spent the last two months reading everything I can online and from my local library. My particular interest is in developing nursery finds and even more so in Australian natives. I'll probably save natives questions for the very excellent AusBonsai.com

I picked up this very interesting bougainvillea at a small nursery the other day. It was the only bougie there and had no label or anything....I wasn't even sure it was for sale. The manager took one look at it and said, 'ah, i'll take $3 for it.' haha!






My wife and I have both talked about how much we love the way it looks right now, but of course, I know it won't stay this way.

I'd really like some styling advice for this guy! I've searched here and other sites for bougy advice, and most seems to focus on huge stumps or young cuttings...this one is different.

My first thought was how cool would it be if I could pull off a triple cascade! I know its a bit unconventional, but I reckon it would look nice.

So yeah, total newbie hoping for some styling tips. I'm in no hurry, so won't be offended if you tell me something like, 'keep it alive for two years and then work.'

cheers!

eddieperth
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Re: a very different Bougainsai

Post  PeacefulAres on Mon Nov 26, 2012 3:21 pm

In essence, the aim of bonsai is to keep a tree in a pot, which has the appearance of a mature tree found in nature. What you're looking to do with this tree wouldn't really be considered Bonsai. If you like the bougainvillea the way it is, just keep it in that little pot and prune the foliage and roots from time to time. It should stay fairly small if it isn't given a large container to grow in.

Realistically though, if you put that thing in the grow for two or three years, you could probably get something very nice to work with. I put a rooted bougie cutting the size of a pencil in the ground in April, and it's already an inch thick. Try to consider your options.


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Re: a very different Bougainsai

Post  eddieperth on Mon Nov 26, 2012 11:19 pm

PeacefulAres wrote:In essence, the aim of bonsai is to keep a tree in a pot, which has the appearance of a mature tree found in nature. What you're looking to do with this tree wouldn't really be considered Bonsai. If you like the bougainvillea the way it is, just keep it in that little pot and prune the foliage and roots from time to time. It should stay fairly small if it isn't given a large container to grow in.

Realistically though, if you put that thing in the grow for two or three years, you could probably get something very nice to work with. I put a rooted bougie cutting the size of a pencil in the ground in April, and it's already an inch thick. Try to consider your options.


Thanks for the reply! To clarify, I wasn't saying that I intend to try and keep it looking like it does now. Was just saying that my wife and I both like the way it currently looks.

I'm definitely open to all options, including planting it for a year or more. Guess I was just curious if there were any interesting options for training based on the way it has currently developed. any thoughts on this?

If I do plant it in the ground...Is nebari important in bougainvillea? haven't particularly noticed ones with nice root structure, the focus seems to be more on the movement of the trunk and the flowers. Is this right? If root structure is important, is there anything I can do to improve it when I plant it?

the 'soil' here is essentially slightly dirty sand, and there are huge bougy's everywhere you go. Should I just put it in the ground, or do something to improve on the local sand?

thanks for any advice and help!

eddieperth
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Re: a very different Bougainsai

Post  PeacefulAres on Mon Nov 26, 2012 11:41 pm

eddieperth wrote:
PeacefulAres wrote:In essence, the aim of bonsai is to keep a tree in a pot, which has the appearance of a mature tree found in nature. What you're looking to do with this tree wouldn't really be considered Bonsai. If you like the bougainvillea the way it is, just keep it in that little pot and prune the foliage and roots from time to time. It should stay fairly small if it isn't given a large container to grow in.

Realistically though, if you put that thing in the grow for two or three years, you could probably get something very nice to work with. I put a rooted bougie cutting the size of a pencil in the ground in April, and it's already an inch thick. Try to consider your options.


Thanks for the reply! To clarify, I wasn't saying that I intend to try and keep it looking like it does now. Was just saying that my wife and I both like the way it currently looks.

I'm definitely open to all options, including planting it for a year or more. Guess I was just curious if there were any interesting options for training based on the way it has currently developed. any thoughts on this?

If I do plant it in the ground...Is nebari important in bougainvillea? haven't particularly noticed ones with nice root structure, the focus seems to be more on the movement of the trunk and the flowers. Is this right? If root structure is important, is there anything I can do to improve it when I plant it?

the 'soil' here is essentially slightly dirty sand, and there are huge bougy's everywhere you go. Should I just put it in the ground, or do something to improve on the local sand?

thanks for any advice and help!

I'm new to bonsai myself, but surface roots and trunk structure are generally the most important features to look for when growing or collecting material. Everything else can be created from the existing tree. Anyway, when I look at this tree, I see the beginnings of a nice informal broom style. Something similar to what you'd see in a wild elm or oak.

As for how you field grow your plants, it's really about what the climate and soil conditions are like. I live in Florida and we basically have sand for soil, but my Bougainvilleas grow fine in it. It's just about finding out what works in your area.

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