Collecting question

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Collecting question

Post  rsmsan on Fri Nov 02, 2012 1:31 pm

Hi, All. My question regarding yamadori is based on the process of collecting. I own a highly wooded area. I have found a number of good candidates. However when collecting, is it best to collect the tree outright in the spring? Or is it best to make major cuts, apply wound sealant,leave the tree in the ground to adjust for a year or so, then bring it out of the ground? For example, some trees need a major height adjustment like from 6ft to 3 ft. The reason I ask is I see a lot of trees undergo some sort of trauma from falling limbs of bigger trees, they remain in the ground, and grow in a natural fashion despite the wound.

Cheers

Richard

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Re: Collecting question

Post  leatherback on Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:07 pm

Personally I would trim the tree, and leave it there. You could at the same time take the effort to use a shovel to cut a circle around the to-be collected plant in order to cut surface main roots, and encourage forming of new feeder roots.

Also see: http://www.bonsai4me.com/AdvTech/ATcollectring%20trees%20from%20the%20wild%20W%20Pall.htm

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Re: Collecting question

Post  drgonzo on Fri Nov 02, 2012 3:11 pm

rsmsan wrote:is it best to make major cuts, apply wound sealant,leave the tree in the ground to adjust for a year or so, then bring it out of the ground?

This is how I have collected many deciduous trees out of northern woods. By allowing the tree time to regrow a canopy (however limited) you then give the tree the potential for some sort of foliage to generate the energy needed to heal the roots and survive the lift next season. I have done it the 'other way' and wound up with dead stumps nearly 100% of the time. It takes a lot of energy to get even a smaller tree out of the forest so I like to try to give them the best chances for survival I can.

I have never collected conifers so my experience is with deciduous 'Hardwood' material only. I reduce the trunk in late spring after the foliage hardens off, then return to collect the tree at bud swell the next spring. Things like vigorous deciduous vines can be chopped and dug in one go.

Swamp/marsh trees like Beech, Ostrya, Honeysuckles, willow etc.. and fruit trees are relatively easy to collect. Nut trees are best left alone as they make huge tap roots, have questionable use as Bonsai, and usually need layering rather then digging to acquire material.
-Jay

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Re: Collecting question

Post  -keith- on Fri Nov 02, 2012 11:14 pm

in addition to the above , if you are not in a big hurry to get them in a pot, pruning and wireing can be done in the ground. IMO this will result in faster developement of branches delaying the shock of digging them up and ajusting to potted life

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Re: Collecting question

Post  cbobgo on Sat Nov 03, 2012 2:29 am

be careful with wiring trees in the ground, as they typically grow faster than potted trees, so the wires will cut in much sooner than you expect.

- bob

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Re: Collecting question

Post  Zach Smith on Mon Nov 05, 2012 12:39 am

You can expect roughly an 80% survival rate by collecting most deciduous species during dormancy, say a month or six weeks before budburst. Seal all large cuts. Don't try to angle your trunk chops. Dust near the cut ends of the large roots with rooting hormone, pot in bonsai mix or a bonsai mix with a little sand added. Water and wait.

Small trees growing in shade under a forest canopy are at greater risk as they tend to be weaker as a result of being shaded. Those you find at the edges of overgrowth, near fencelines and in ditches, are usually much stronger due to the extra sun they get.

Good luck!

Zach

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