Lime Sulpher

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Lime Sulpher

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Wed Oct 03, 2012 4:59 pm

I had some old Lime Sulfer that I poured on our dirt driveway. This is what we call a "Black Vulture" and they hunt by smell. We had as many as three at one time checking out the LS.

Billy M. Rhodes
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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Stan Kengai on Wed Oct 03, 2012 5:26 pm

Too funny!! Vultures are one of God's most disgusting creatures. I once saw one climb into a deer carcass on the side of the road. They are vile, but well designed for the job they do. I bet they were miffed that they never found those rotten eggs.

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  coh on Wed Oct 03, 2012 5:59 pm

Interesting...while the job they do (scavenging dead animals) may be vile, I find the vultures themselves anything but. To me, they are one of the most graceful creatures, the way the soar effortlessly on the air currents. We have a gorge nearby (Letchworth) where you can stand on the top and watch them float by on the air currents at eye level. Marvelous.

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:04 pm

However, they smell like what they eat and are very clumsy on the ground. Ever hit one with a car, what a mess. Here in Florida they will some times play chicken with a car and stay on a road kill till the last second, some times they don't time it right. I almost hit one on Sunday at KSC.

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Poink88 on Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:11 pm

Vultures help us more than most realize, it is a dirty job and I am glad they do it (for free). Like the under appreciated trash collectors, imagine them not showing up for a few months... Wink

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  JimLewis on Wed Oct 03, 2012 7:45 pm

Thus spake (I suspect) a city boy:
Vultures are one of God's most disgusting creatures.

This country boy quickly interposes: And, one of His most useful.

They clean up after other beings -- which is more than most of us will do unless required.

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Wed Oct 03, 2012 10:58 pm

Billy on our side they are called corbeau [ turkey vulture ]
http://www.birdsoftt.com/birds_info/turkey%20vulture.htm

Very graceful as gliders.
Later.
Khaimraj

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  JudyB on Wed Oct 03, 2012 11:46 pm

Here in Ohio we celebrate their return in spring... google up buzzards and Hinkley Ohio for a look at the annual festivals..

The black buzzard on the other hand is starting to be a problem as far as the farmers are concerned, as they say that they prey on livestock - link-
http://www.farmanddairy.com/news/black-vulture-kills-increasing-in-ohio/9360.html

I like how graceful they are, and my dogs love to race them! They do a really great service, if you see them on the road, you just have to give them time to move from the feast. Very interesting that they were brought by a smell, didn't know their smell senses were so good. Guess it makes sense however...

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  JimLewis on Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:06 am

Khaimraj Seepersad wrote:Billy on our side they are called corbeau [ turkey vulture ]
http://www.birdsoftt.com/birds_info/turkey%20vulture.htm

Very graceful as gliders.
Later.
Khaimraj

Uh uh. The Turkey vulture is a completely different bird than the ones Billy described. Here on the mainland east coast, we have 2 species, the black vulture (Coragyps atratus) (Billy's, with a featherless gray/black head)) and the turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) which has a bare red head -- hence the name "turkey". Appropos of little or nothing, all in all in N and S America we have seven species of vulture in 5 genera, including the California and Andean condors which are among the world's largest flying birds.

The European "vultures" are not related -- at least not directly -- to the American birds.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Thu Oct 04, 2012 1:55 am

Khaimraj Seepersad wrote:Billy on our side they are called corbeau [ turkey vulture ]
http://www.birdsoftt.com/birds_info/turkey%20vulture.htm

We have the Turkey Vulture also, but he has a red head, the black vulture does not, his head is black. Different birds, also the turkey vulture finds his food by sight, but the black is drawn to smell. We frequently see them on the same road kill.

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:09 am

Jim, Billy,

I happily stand corrected.
I am also very thankful for all these birds do.
Until.
Khaimraj

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  coh on Thu Oct 04, 2012 2:32 pm

Khaimraj,

Where are you located? Your profile just says "West Indies". To me, that means somewhere in the Caribbean. If that is the case, then you probably do get the "American" turkey vultures. I found this paragraph on-line from "A Field Guide to the Birds of the West Indies":

The American vultures comprise a small family of seven species, only one of which, the Turkey Vulture, is known from the West Indies...

Also, the Cornell Ornithology Website has a range map showing them in the West Indies, and I found numerous other references to this as well.

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:31 pm

Chris,

it's Trinidad, only 7 miles from Venezuela, so we get a good many of the life forms that are in South America.
I got corrected because of my slack english Laughing

What I should have said was - Billy we have vultures as well, and they are called x,y or z.

Now I am wondering if we have both types as I don't recall all of our vultures having coloured heads, but then I normally just watch them in the sky at great heights.
Probably will get another slap on the wrists from the elderheads. Embarassed
Back to having some trees photographed.
Stay well.
Khaimraj

* Due to the ease of someone acquiring free Bonsai, I don't always mention where I live specifically.
My trees have grown older with me and are mostly from seed or cuttings, or are birthday/Christmas/gifts or have special memories, loss, would really hurt.

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  coh on Thu Oct 04, 2012 5:41 pm

Khaimraj,

Your wording ("on our side") threw me at first as well, since I saw West Indies in your profile. If I had just checked your link I would have seen Trinidad... Anyway, the Field guide I referenced states: "There are sight records of the smaller Black Vulture from Cuba and the southern Lesser Antilles". Sounds like they are less common than the turkey vulture, though I don't know how old that book is.

I do understand what you're saying about what it would mean to lose trees, and why it's smart to be careful about disclosing too much info on the internet.

coh
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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Thu Oct 04, 2012 6:52 pm

I think the immature Turkey Vulture also has a black head, but the two species hunt differently, the Turkey hunts by sight, my Wife claims the Black Vulture is one of the few birds that can smell? I don't know.

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  coh on Thu Oct 04, 2012 8:41 pm

Some interesting info regarding birds and sense of smell:

Avian Sense of Smell (Stanford)

Do birds have sense of smell (Audobon)

Birds have a good sense of smell (Science Daily)

This piece claims that its turkey vultures that hunt by smell, and black vultures hunt more by sight. I think the jury is still out...but I bet no one knew there was a "turkey vulture society"!

Turkey vulture facts (Turkey Vulture Society)

coh
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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:29 pm

Thank you Chris,
Later.
Khaimraj

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Re: Lime Sulpher

Post  JimLewis on Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:44 pm

I bet no one knew there was a "turkey vulture society"!

You're right, but I'm not surprised. There is a society for everything these days.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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