Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

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Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Tue Sep 25, 2012 4:35 pm

I was asked on a separate topic if the person I use as a reference does bonsai...so I wanted to show one of the displays of his I have seen. Translation of the text listed below.


席題 松柏千年のみどり 葛原洪行
Sekidai Shouhaku Sennnen no Midori by Kuzuhara Ikkou
真の真体による席飾り
Shin no Shin Style Seki Kazari
盆栽といえば黒松に代表され、また直幹といえば「真の真体」として盆栽樹形中最も端正な形姿とされる。つまり一番位の高い樹なのである。
その黒松直幹を主木に、掛け軸を配しての飾り。軸の「松柏千年青」は禅語(南宋ナンソウ末期スエキの禅僧(Priest)石田法薫和尚の掲)であり、「千年のみどりのようにいつまでも目出度く、幸多かれ」との慶祝(けいしゅく)の意も込められる。
人はともすると華簾(かれん)に咲く花に目を奪われ(うばわれるto be fascinated by)がちだが、不変、不動の松柏のよさをこそ忘れるなかれと自戒(じかいself examination)し、一時の華やかさより変りなき不変の根本精神を身につけたいと願っての飾りであろう。
When one says bonsai, the black pine is the representative tree, and furthermore when you say Chokkan as the Shin no Shin style of bonsai styling, it is the pinnacle of a handsome shape. In other words, it is the highest tree standard to attain.
This black pine acting as the main tree, is a companion with the scroll. The scroll phrase of Shouhaku Sennen no Aoi is a Zen phrase by the Nansou Sueki Priest, Ishida. The phrase is a celebratory blessing that 1,000 years of green stands out to our eyes and brings much happiness.
When we are with others, we are fascinated by seeing the blooming flowers of the Karen, we are required to self reflect on the unchanging and immovable nature of the Pines and Deciduous trees. I hope to convey to the viewer the immutable laws of nature of the spirit’s foundation, by bringing to mind the unchanging of the single Ka flower.

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Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Bob Bailey on Tue Sep 25, 2012 5:29 pm

Nice Black Pine,completely wrong table and I may be missing something,but sorry the display does nothing for me.

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  kora on Wed Sep 26, 2012 7:56 pm

Here is the problem with the display-as I see it-others may disagree, and that is ok.
1. this is a tokonoma style display, but it is not IN a tokonoma. A tokonoma has walls or posts on either side, clearly framing the display. Visually, even tho we see the bamboo dividers, there is no frame.
2. If the display had a companion plant or object, or a secondary tree, then that would visually give more of a unified"closed" feeling.
3. I agree, the stand is wrong-too big and the legs too dainty for a chokan.
this is a very good example of why a tokonoma style display only works IN a tokonoma ot at least a free standing table.

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 4:34 am

kora wrote:Here is the problem with the display-as I see it-others may disagree, and that is ok.
1. this is a tokonoma style display, but it is not IN a tokonoma. A tokonoma has walls or posts on either side, clearly framing the display. Visually, even tho we see the bamboo dividers, there is no frame.
2. If the display had a companion plant or object, or a secondary tree, then that would visually give more of a unified"closed" feeling.
3. I agree, the stand is wrong-too big and the legs too dainty for a chokan.
this is a very good example of why a tokonoma style display only works IN a tokonoma ot at least a free standing table.

私の黒松と松柏千年青の掛け軸での飾りは通常の「席飾り」(せきかざり)です。床飾り(床飾り)ではありません。ですから青い毛氈を敷いた上に飾っています。床飾りでは絶対に毛氈などを敷くことがありません。床の間に毛氈など敷くのは邪道とされています。
以上が床の間の概略です。

This is one paragraph of a long discourse from Kuzuhara Sensei. My intuition on why this was classified as a Seki kazari was correct.
My Black Pine and Shohaku Sennen no Midori no Kakejiku is a normal seki kazari. It is not a Toko Kazari. This is why there was a blue Shitajiki set down over the display. In a Toko Kazari display one definietely does not lay down a Shitajiki. Putting a Shitajiki down in a Toko no Ma display would be like committing heresy.

Jonathan's opinion, "Also this was a juried competition of both Gadou and Keidou practitioners who published the book...I do not think that they would misclassify this as a Toko Kazari when they published it as a Seki Kazari..."

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  kora on Sat Sep 29, 2012 5:10 am

Fisrt you must explain the difference between a seki Kazari and a toko kazari and Shitajiki-it is very difficult for most people to understand all these technical Japanese terms-of course most of us know some of them-but please don't be so obtuse,kora

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biting the hand that feeds

Post  stonener on Sat Sep 29, 2012 7:24 am

hey kora,
got a couple of questions!
for you...

why "must first explain differences?"
why not a little researching on your part?


why not learn "technical Japanese terms"?
do you cook Italian using other terms?
do they not reinforce what your talking about?

why obtuse? "pot - kettle"
why so demanding? "sugar - vinegar"
DO YOU LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN THE MOUTH?... Basketball








Last edited by stonener on Sat Sep 29, 2012 7:49 am; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : toning it down, some more)

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  kora on Sat Sep 29, 2012 8:19 am

Stonerer:
Why did you feel you needed to tone it down some more in your editing? FYI, I do know the difference between a toko kazeri and a seki kazari-but I have always thought that this forums' purpose is to educate and not just show off esoteric words in foreign languages. In Japan, many seki kazari displays have a wall on either side, so the display is framed-that would give this display a very different feeling, and when I cook Italian, I do it German, one of 5 languages I speak,kora

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  William N. Valavanis on Sat Sep 29, 2012 12:48 pm

I agree with Kora!

The reason why the technical Japanese terms need to be translated here is because the author first used and introduced them here in his discussion.

Sorry, I don't cook Italian, but do cook a little Greek. My Grandmother, from Greece only used English when cooking because when she immigrated to our great country she learned English. People did not need to learn Greek to communicate with her. Since this forum is in English I think the text should be in English too.

And, by the way I don't even use AND Japanese terminology when teaching bonsai. The only word I use is "bonsai," because it's too difficult to easily translate, especially when I'm trying to share and spread our art to Westerners. I NEVER use: nebari, chokkan, sekikazari, tokonoma, moyogi, hasami, mizu koke, tachiagari, bunjin, hachi, shoku kakejuku, etc. Not necessary when there is an English language equivalent.

Getting back to the original critique discussion of the Japanese black pine display:

I like the style and color of the display table, but, it is in my opinion, a bit too large. However, larger is better than smaller when selecting display tables. Maybe a smaller size was not available, or damaged on way to the exhibit? I don't understand the scroll, because I don't read or write Japanese, but it looks quiet and that's the feeling the artist want to convey, or at least conveys to me. I don't mind the missing companion to the Japanese black pine, although I generally use one. Without the companion the display suggests great space and openness and the bonsai becomes the most important element of the display.

But I do understand this style of Japanese display and do not criticize it just because I personally do not like it. Every artist must decide what looks good to him, hopefully, using basic design principles. That's what Ichiu Katayama did when he established the "Keido School of Display" in the late 1970s to early 1980s. He taught HIS style of display, and many Japanese jumped on the wagon because there was no other school and embraced it and studied it. He had a small group of serious students, among which was Mr. Kuzuhara, I believe. This popular school of display was also quickly accepted by Westerners as THE Japanese style of display (for bonsai, suiseki and companions- plants and objects) (OK, I often use the Japanese term of suiseki), because there is no other school of display. Westerners wanted to learn the Japanese way of display and a model or "rules" to learn how to display in the Japanese style was nor still is available. The Japanese have their own taste for appreciation of bonsai and suiseki, which most agree to, but not all.

One I asked a prominent Japanese bonsai artist if he does Keido. He said, what do you mean? I use my own taste!

Hope this helps, or fuels the discussion.

Bill

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:03 pm

kora wrote:Fisrt you must explain the difference between a seki Kazari and a toko kazari and Shitajiki-it is very difficult for most people to understand all these technical Japanese terms-of course most of us know some of them-but please don't be so obtuse,kora
to

The translation was provided because you had stated that this was a Toko no Ma like display and not a seki kazari....I had asked Kuzuhara Shi why it was classified as a Seki Kazari. Allowing us all to learn that when one uses a Shitajiki (I believe I stated its color above and there was only one blue element in the picture) it is used for a space outside of a Toko no Ma to set up a display with bonsai/suiseki. I only had the time and energy to translate that little section.

If it seemed obtuse perhaps it was laziness or fatigue to provide the entire context of the discussion.

However, at Church when I interpret for the non-Japanese speakers, most of them express gratitude when I provide translation even only when I have the speed to provide 50% of what the speaker is saying to the audience.

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:06 pm

stonener wrote:hey kora,
got a couple of questions!
for you...

why "must first explain differences?"
why not a little researching on your part?


why not learn "technical Japanese terms"?
do you cook Italian using other terms?
do they not reinforce what your talking about?

why obtuse? "pot - kettle"
why so demanding? "sugar - vinegar"
DO YOU LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN THE MOUTH?... Basketball

Be nice...I did not take her response as being that harsh, maybe that some readers would be confused with the answer.


Last edited by Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:08 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : My Reply was inside the quotation...)

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:44 pm

William N. Valavanis wrote:I agree with Kora!

The reason why the technical Japanese terms need to be translated here is because the author first used and introduced them here in his discussion.

Sorry, I don't cook Italian, but do cook a little Greek. My Grandmother, from Greece only used English when cooking because when she immigrated to our great country she learned English. People did not need to learn Greek to communicate with her. Since this forum is in English I think the text should be in English too.

Bill

We have been over Japanese usage ad nauseum. I am not going to defend how I communicate. I am only one post away from someone saying I did not understand this term...and me replying sorry here is a longer definition. My Brother in Law is also from a Greek American family and even though they
speak English there are still expressions they use when together that I don't understand. This does not stop me from asking them what they mean.

I can't win for losing, get criticized by my wife for not using Japanese more and from this and other sites for using Japanese too much... Mad

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:55 pm

William N. Valavanis wrote:

Getting back to the original critique discussion of the Japanese black pine display:

I like the style and color of the display table, but, it is in my opinion, a bit too large. However, larger is better than smaller when selecting display tables. Maybe a smaller size was not available, or damaged on way to the exhibit? I don't understand the scroll, because I don't read or write Japanese, but it looks quiet and that's the feeling the artist want to convey, or at least conveys to me. I don't mind the missing companion to the Japanese black pine, although I generally use one. Without the companion the display suggests great space and openneess and the bonsai becomes the most important element of the display.

Hope this helps, or fuels the discussion.

Bill

I think Valvanis San has hit it on the head. Openness and putting primary emphasis back on the main tree are accomplished by the higher table and the ommission of the kusamono (companion plant) or soe (accent piece). Additionally, using such a large table with no companion plant allows one to reinforce the Hidari Katte, Migi Nagare or flow to the right of the display. The open surface area of the table allows the tree to be placed more to the left helping to reinforce the flow even without the companion plant. For a more visual cue to this concept of flow in the display see the thread Opinions before the Critique.

It actually feels bad that the above translation does not do justice to the phrase...perhaps rereading will allow for more introspective thought. This calligraphy is absolutely georgeous in my opinion. In the displays I study about 30-40% use calligraphy. So I think we miss the boat when we only focus on safe sumie themes.



Last edited by Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:57 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Forgot to put in the sentence about the other thread for a visual comparison)

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 3:05 pm

William N. Valavanis wrote:But I do understand this style of Japanese display and do not criticize it just because I personally do not like it. Every artist must decide what looks good to him, hopefully, using basic design principles. That's what Ichiu Katayama did when he established the "Keido School of Display" harn the late 1970s to early 1980s. He taught HIS style of display, and many Japanese jumped on the wagon because there was no other school and embraced it and studied it. He had a small group of serious students, among which was Mr. Kuzuhara, I believe. This popular school of display was also quickly accepted by Westerners as THE Japanese style of display (for bonsai, suiseki and companions- plants and objects) (OK, I often use the Japanese term of suiseki), because there is no other school of display. Westerners wanted to learn the Japanese way of display and a model or "rules" to learn how to display in the Japanese style was nor still is available. The Japanese have their own taste for appreciation of bonsai and suiseki, which most agree to, but not all.

One I asked a prominent Japanese bonsai artist if he does Keido. He said, what do you mean? I use my own taste!

Hope this helps, or fuels the discussion.

Bill

Kuzuhara Sensei is indeed a student of Katayama, in the Gaddou style. (He is a Shihan rank within this system, if that carrys any weight to anyone) However, he is the only person for display that I have been able to approach that has given me the explanations that provide a well rounded understanding of the "guidelines" that allows one to set up a coherent display whether it is from a Japanese, American or British cultural context. In other words the lightbulb finally came on!

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  kora on Sat Sep 29, 2012 3:55 pm

I was addressing the display from a different point of view-namely at least from my point of view it is very difficult to see this display by its own, when it is on an open table, despite the dividers. When we do long continuous tables, yes with dividers- these displays are very different from the displays we show on single free standing tables with a backdrop..
. One other comment,about the scroll:
While I personally like a written scroll-, as opposed to a picture scroll, I often hear the complaint, that as the viewer cannot read the saying, they can only judge the display as a visual. For all we know, the poem may or may not be apropriate-

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  dick benbow on Sat Sep 29, 2012 5:06 pm

Kora, I agree with what you said about not being able to understand if the scroll poem written in a language not understood by it's viewers, is or is not appropriate.

part of me loves to see "the japanese look" that it presents, and another part of me wants to be able to understand what is being said.

I have been so fortunate to find a sumi-e artist to do my art work for the shikishi boards, and now I'm in search of an artist that can make the writing in japanese with sub titles, on a stand alone board.

In that way I think I can achieve the "look" I want yet allow the viewers to be a part and be drawn into the display better.

For example I'm working with the main title of WIND with smaller text to say
the whirling sky is calling out, with the loudest voice of all.

I know some of the artists in the local sumi-e group might be able to help me out, so I'm planning to attend a meeting to seek out an individual. I'll post what it looks like when I do.

My bonsai teacher, David de Groot, is working on a new book with chapters on different tree styles. One accepted standard for design is wind swept, but a softer look, which i want the scroll poem for, he calls wind blown.

It seems i have to have projects to work on to keep me going. I was able to get my may issue of kinbon magazine That Bill V was so kind to get for me, into the hands yesterday
of a landscaper who can translate an issue devoted to chojubai quince.

Sorry for the ramble... I would like to hear others opinion if the mixing of written languages would work in a display here.

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Sat Sep 29, 2012 6:30 pm

kora wrote:While I personally like a written scroll-, as opposed to a picture scroll, I often hear the complaint, that as the viewer cannot read the saying, they can only judge the display as a visual. For all we know, the poem may or may not be apropriate-

Most of the calligraphy for Japanese displays are written in Sousho or Kana and are illegible by even the Japanese viewing the display...The one in this display happens to be in Semi-cursive and is very legible....

And look at the thread of the third page of Display Critique for the scroll and that is not only illegible, but utilizes characters that are not Joyo (standard) leaving the meaning very ambiguous and impossible to read without the displayer explaining the meaning in the book...

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Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  kora on Mon Oct 01, 2012 4:21 pm

One more observation about this display:It is recommended by Japanese masters, f.i.Uhaku Sudo and Kunio Kobayashi, that one object in a display should convey the season, now looking at this display, we do not know if it is Spring, Summer, Fall or Winter. One function of a companion-be it a scroll or a plant would tell you what season this display is-if you are using a deciduous tree, that would show the season, and then no further mention need to be made, via scroll or companion plant-I am not sure, if the meaning of the scroll conveys that.

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:41 pm

kora wrote:One more observation about this display:It is recommended by Japanese masters, f.i.Uhaku Sudo and Kunio Kobayashi, that one object in a display should convey the season, now looking at this display, we do not know if it is Spring, Summer, Fall or Winter. One function of a companion-be it a scroll or a plant would tell you what season this display is-if you are using a deciduous tree, that would show the season, and then no further mention need to be made, via scroll or companion plant-I am not sure, if the meaning of the scroll conveys that.



Can you please then explain how the season is conveyed from this display by Katayama Ichiu Katayama, Ichiu; Keido
Katayamaryu Kyohon/Keido Katayama Style Textbook, 1986.

BTW: the characters are 生(Top)無 (Middle) 心 (Bottom) Top is to live, middle is a negating word and bottom is heart (spirit). It is a common phrase for Zen...

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  dick benbow on Mon Oct 01, 2012 10:05 pm

If i sense the spirit intended by the originator, the display and message transends a sense of season and narrows the display down to just today. the tree aptly shows life and death and the stuggle to continue on with it's gin and shari. I love the message in the scroll, especially about the heart. I'd love to see a tenpai of a cat curled up and in rest. To me this would bring about a warm sense
of contentment. Life is a gift, gratitude from the heart is a necessity of everyday life, petting a cat calms the spirit and brings a sense that all is well with the day.

I have lived in my house close to 35 years. I have watched generations of crows grow up and raise their young. this first day of october, annually the youngsters watch the parents to fly up to the highest electrical wire with a walnut, retreived from a backyard tree. As the cars progress under the wire, the crows time their nut drop to allow the cars to crack th hard shell into the next meal.( in all the yrs i have never seen a car hit, much to my respect of these birds) It's something special to me because i understand the season and what this activity represents. To me a crow and a nut would tell me fall while to someone else it might mean nothing.

I think that's why display allows the presenter and the guest an opportunity to engage in conversation as to what is meant and what is perceived. Smile

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:53 pm

Wait...top one is it live or love...生 愛?

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  kora on Tue Oct 02, 2012 12:29 am

So maybe, what the masters say and what they do is not always the same???-I brought up the seasonality -because I just reread a handout from a seminar given at one of the GSBF(Golden State Bonsai Federation)-additionally one more possibility could be, that either a figurine or companion plant is displayed in the secondary alcove-(many tokonoma have a secondary niche)just maybe a far fetched hunch?kora

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keido scroll reading...

Post  saruyama on Tue Oct 02, 2012 7:54 am

Someone pointed me in the direction of this thread, and for what it's worth and without wishing to sound condescending or showing off or 'owt like that, it would appear, and I may be wrong, not having the book in front of me, but the scroll reads in very cursive script,

雲 無 心  or cloud nothing spirit

which is a reference to a work by the 5th Century Chinese Poet Tao Yuanming, a line from which has struck a chord with the Japanese, 雲無心以出岫/鳥倦飛而知還 which roughly translates as

"The clouds aimlessly rise from the peaks / The birds weary of flying know it is time to come home"

This is taken from a work entitled "Retiring and returning home" or something similar. He was renowned for his rustic imagery and solitude in nature...being a hermit farmer who dropped out of official life to write poetry and get drunk. Another hero of mine...got to love those Chinese poets.

The meaning of the poem in the context of the display is to evoke a sense of calm, becoming at one with nature, allowing ones ill feelings to be blown away with the wind, to rise above the troubles of everyday life and appreciate the grandeur of the natural world.

I maybe wrong though, my cursive reading and Chinese poetry skills leave a lot to be desired. As for a season, there is not an obvious one denoted, Tea Ceremonies using the same words have been held in March through until November, so make of that what you will. Although Keido displays are generally seasonal, there are some which buck the trend. Contrary to belief, Japanese arts are not something which is set in stone by iron clad dictates. Artistry is exhibited in the subtle bending and breaking of the non existent rules.

As for the first display, whilst the meaning of the scroll maybe appropriate, the characters appear to be written by someone with little artistry as the brush strokes lack character and are not particularly appropriate for such a phrase or powerful little tree. As it is a shin-no-shin display then cursive script would be inappropriate, but the strength of the regular writing leaves a little to be desired, as does the very informal scroll mounting which is as informal as they get. It lacks the dignity and high quality material/craftsmanship that you would come to expect from a truly formal display.

Further study of the meanings behind display add a whole extra level of understanding and appreciation however as Alexander Pope once said,

A little learning is a dangerous thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.


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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  fiona on Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:43 am

saruyama wrote:as Alexander Pope once said,
A little learning is a dangerous thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.
I often wonder if in those the two lines Oor Sandy was predicting that aspect of the future that has come to be known as the internet forum. Wink Very Happy Evil or Very Mad

I follow this forum regularly but seldom comment as I am aware that I don't have sufficient knowledge to make any sort of intellectual contribution. I am however very interested in Peter's comment about artistry "exhibited in the subtle bending and breaking of the non existent rules". I will start a new thread rather than hijack Jonathan's though.

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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

Post  Kakejiku on Tue Oct 02, 2012 1:06 pm

saruyama wrote:As for the first display, whilst the meaning of the scroll maybe appropriate, the characters appear to be written by someone with little artistry as the brush strokes lack character and are not particularly appropriate for such a phrase or powerful little tree. As it is a shin-no-shin display then cursive script would be inappropriate, but the strength of the regular writing leaves a little to be desired, as does the very informal scroll mounting which is as informal as they get. It lacks the dignity and high quality material/craftsmanship that you would come to expect from a truly formal display.

This last paragraph you wrote about the scroll mounting style not working with a Sou no Sou style scroll just made no sense. Below is an excerpt from the conversation that I had with Kuzuhara Sensei specifically about scroll styles as this thread was going on Underlined section is the first ...I will also get a scan later in the day with the different Sousho writing forms of cloud and love...Not that I doubt your translation...but as a reference for readers to see how difficult it is to read Sousho and there may be an alternative reading...And I am not going to spend the time to translate, but in short he has a difficult time sourcing the style of scroll he desires. 輪褙 Rinhoe...As the scroll maker I am still having a dificult time understanding whether he wants the Maru Hyougu with Hosoi Hashira (Sou no Gyou) or the Fukuro Hyougu style scroll (Sou no Sou).

了解です。使いづらいのは幢褙(どうほえ)のことです。使いやすいのは輪褙の方です。
私の欲しいのは、本紙の図柄も掛け軸の仕立ても「草の位」の掛け軸なのです。
主飾りは山野草盆栽を飾ることが多いため、一番軽い感じのもので、山野草の配軸として飾れるものを望んでいます。
これは既製品を探してもなかなかありませんし、絵描きさん(画家)に頼んでも絵を主張したきつい絵を描いてしまうので、掛け軸が強く感じて、掛け軸そのものが主飾りになってしまい、主飾りであるべき山野草盆栽が負けてしまいます。
通常の床の間飾りは掛け軸が主飾りなのでそれでも良いのですが、雅道は前に飾る盆栽が主飾りで、掛け軸はあくまでも配軸(脇役)の形をとります。
盆栽より勝ってはダメなのです。盆栽を引き立てる役目であって、掛け軸が主張してはダメなのです。
従って本紙の図柄は単的なものでなければなりません。たとえば滝の図ならば、滝の水の流れだけを描いて、周辺の岩や木の枝などは描かず素滝の図が一番適します。
そしてまる表装か文人表具が最適です。この呼び方は雅道で使っている言葉で、表具師のあいだでは違った呼び方をするのかもしれません。
普通の表具師に説明してもなかなか理解してもらえないのが実情です。
真や行の掛け軸は、希に使うことがあるものの、雅道ではほとんど「草の位」の掛け軸です。又は「草の行」ぐらいのものを文人木盆栽に使うこともあります。
そのようなわけで、絵描きさんの描いたものは、どうしても絵を主張してしまうので、私は使いたい図柄のものを写真に撮り、それをパソコンに取り込んでソフトを使って日本画調に加工し、ごく色薄くして和紙にプリントをして使用しています。
雅道の飾りを勉強してこないと理解しづらいかもしれませんが、そのようなことで、掛け軸に関しては苦労しているうちの一つです。

今、かなり大きい台風が接近してきているので飛ばされそうな盆栽を室内に取り込んだところです。被害が少なくて通り過ぎて欲しいものです。

          葛原一洪

葛原先生へ

飾ることは難しいことを了解です。

先生は輪褙(りんほえ)表具にたいする正しいですが、表具のしおりの本で左右柱の幅は2-3分(太いとき五分)です。輪褙は草位の掛け軸です。
ろうほの表具言葉分かりませんが、先生はたぶん幢褙(どうほえ)を説明しているかもしれません。幢褙は行位の掛け軸です。しかし、輪褙と幢褙の間に草の行か行の真があります。ただいまそこの細かい件、上の本を勉強しています。

先生は確かに私より盆栽、水石、床の間、卓、地板、添え、や飾りことをわかります。
掛け軸に対する、僕が毎日江戸表具師の佐川太心様行っている勉強しているです。
得に、月の中縁は 正絹二丁遠州(しょうけんにちょうえんしゅう)です。一メートルは一万円ぐらいかかります。
ジョナサンより

掛け軸の写真を見せていただきましたが、左右の柱が太いため雅道では使いにくいものとなっています。
雅道では輪補仕立(りんぽしたて)の柱の細いものを使用します。
ろうほ仕立ての柱の太いものは掛け軸が強すぎて、前に飾る盆栽が負けてしまったり、また拮抗したりしてバランスが悪くなるためまず使用しません。
また、月の図は雲の色が濃すぎて重苦しので、前に飾る盆栽が負けてしまい、配軸としての役割ではなくなってしまいますし、滝の図は周囲の岩などが描いてない素滝の図が一番使いやすくて、盆栽と拮抗することがないので、そのような図柄のもがよいです。
ですからお気持ちはありがたいのですが、どちらも使いづらい図柄なのでご遠慮させていただきます。どうぞお気遣いなく。

                        葛原一洪


Kakejiku
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Kakejiku Side Note

Post  Kakejiku on Tue Oct 02, 2012 1:18 pm

If the translation is of a Chinese poem, then it would be easy to understand why the scroll is mounted in the way it is. Let's say this scroll was not made custom and it was just handed to the Hyougushi as this chinese poem. Hyougushi is going to first say...Chinese primarily mount in the Sou no Sou format, so I am going to go with that. If you want a visual comparison...look at the styles of scrolls hanging in the dojo in the Newest Karate Kid with Jackie Chan, and then compare it to the scrolls hanging in the dojo in Karate Kid II film. Chinese (Informal Style) Japanese (More Formal Styles)...It is a generalization, but is often true. Second, the cloth color makes sense because he is trying to match a color to the meaning of the poem....Just FYI for a few of the simpler principles taught for Scroll Design before mounting...

Kakejiku
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Re: Kuzuhara Ikkou Display

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