Carnivorous plants

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Carnivorous plants

Post  Teol on Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:01 pm

Somebody ever thought of/done this? Smile

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  Kev Bailey on Wed Aug 05, 2009 7:19 pm

I did. Some make a nice unusual accent plant to accompany a bonsai.

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  fiona on Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:30 pm

Juancalas has a superb example of a Venus Fly trap as an accent plant in his post on the Bonsai board entitled My Accent Plants.

Tomorrow I'm planning on planting up an example of an indigenous UK carnivorous plant in one of my new Dan Butler accent pots. Will post pic soon as I can.

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  Kev Bailey on Thu Aug 06, 2009 12:11 am

Sundew Fionnghal?

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  fiona on Thu Aug 06, 2009 12:26 am

Kev Bailey wrote:Sundew Fionnghal?
That's the nicest thing you've ever called me, Kev

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  fiona on Thu Aug 06, 2009 12:32 am

But the answer (I think) is yes it is sundew. It's one which grows in the Lake District and apparently tends to be found growing on/in sphagnum moss. Don't know much about it yet but will be more than delighted to hear from those who know it.

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  Kev Bailey on Thu Aug 06, 2009 11:38 am

A rosette of stems each with a flat pad covered in red hairs with a sticky globule on the end of each? They trap insects in the glue and supplement the very poor nutrition available to them in the bog. I've seen loads but never tried growing one.

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  fiona on Thu Aug 06, 2009 1:35 pm

It looks like this. I got it from Tony who got it from someone who says it grows in the Lake District. Presumably that's not the only place in the UK then.


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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  Teol on Thu Aug 06, 2009 1:57 pm

fionnghal wrote:Juancalas has a superb example of a Venus Fly trap as an accent plant in his post on the Bonsai board entitled My Accent Plants.

Tomorrow I'm planning on planting up an example of an indigenous UK carnivorous plant in one of my new Dan Butler accent pots. Will post pic soon as I can.

You'll have to excuse me for seeming stupid, but it doesn't quite look like a bonsai. Though you guys have a better understanding of what a bonsai is, I was thinking more of a single plant with a strong stem and bark. Which leads me to my question(s); what is a bonsai? Because Juancalas had a lot of them that didn't meet my expectations (don't get me wrong, I'm out to learn). And also I've noticed people using different types of frases, so does someone have any good books (preferably pdf) about the "whole culture"? Very Happy

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  AlainK on Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:40 pm

I know this is not an answer to theol's question, but I'm taking the opportunity to show you my Pinguicula 'Tina'. the photo was taken in august 2007, it has divided itself into 3 plants now. The light green of the leaves and the colour of the flowers are really beautiful "in real life". I'm sure it could make a nice accent plant.


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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  fiona on Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:54 pm

Teol wrote: You'll have to excuse me for seeming stupid, but it doesn't quite look like a bonsai. Very Happy
Don't worry - there's no such thing as a stupid question on here. What we are talking about here is what we call accent plants (Japanese call them Shitakusa or Kusamono). They are small plants you use to complement a bonsai in a formal Japanese display such as you often find at exhibitions.

So you are quite right - they are not bonsai themselves.

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  Lee Kennedy on Thu Aug 06, 2009 3:40 pm

Me and the kids have a few Sundew's,they seem to prefer really wet condition's but this is only based on a few weeks here so far,mine have started to flower too

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  fiona on Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:24 pm

To get back slightly to Teol's original question, I'm actually struggling to think of a carnivorous plant that would grow as a tree. Possibly a tropical to fit the bill? I dunno.

I suspect we'll have to stick to using them as accent plants and on the strength of your query Teol, I just rushed out and bought a Sarracenia, a Venus Fly Trap and a something else whose name escapes me. I'm going to add them to the Sundews to create a Little Shop of Horrors accent planting.

btw Teol, don't get us all started on the "what is a bonsai?" issue if you wish to kep your sanity! Laughing It becomes very in-depth and philosophical, and 100+ posts later you'll still not be certain. There are actually a couple of (lengthy) posts on here which might answer your question. But do be warned!
lol!

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  mr treevolution on Thu Aug 06, 2009 9:56 pm

Do not water any of the popular carnivores with tap water! They are probobly the most lime intollerant plants going! Clean fresh rain is best.They should never be fed or potted in any media which is nutricious. Peat and fine spagnum moss mixed is best, although i have seen peat and vermiculite used. Found sundew to be quite a timid plant. Saracenia are my favourite, bigger the better, great for trapping wasps!

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  fiona on Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:06 pm

Mr Treevolution wrote: Saracenia are ... great for trapping wasps!
It gets better by the minute!
I normally use tap water but then we live in an area of very soft water. I might just use rain water from now on - we usually have an endless supply of that but it all seems to have gone to England just now. Oh sad! Laughing I was planning on potting into peat and sphagnum but now you've confirmed my thinking. Many thanks for that.

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  AlainK on Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:42 am

Mr Treevolution wrote:Do not water any of the popular carnivores with tap water! They are probobly the most lime intollerant plants going!

True for most of them, except at least for Pinguicula 'Tina':

In general, butterworts grow in nutrient poor, alkaline soils.
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinguicula)

But I strongly doubt that a carnivorous plant can be trained as a bonsai, unless there is some stock left from the Little Shop of Horrors... affraid

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  Teol on Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:19 pm

fionnghal wrote:btw Teol, don't get us all started on the "what is a bonsai?" issue if you wish to kep your sanity! Laughing It becomes very in-depth and philosophical, and 100+ posts later you'll still not be certain. There are actually a couple of (lengthy) posts on here which might answer your question. But do be warned!
lol!

Haha, was actually unsure to post the question just for that reason, because I know it has a much more deeper meaning than just being a small tree. But then again, you never learn if you never ask Razz About the carnivorous plants, I've been reading about it all day (it's easy to get side tracked on the web Laughing ) and have to take break now, but I'll be posting at least a list about some of the ones I found interesting.

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  fiona on Sat Aug 08, 2009 9:30 am

AlainK wrote: But I strongly doubt that a carnivorous plant can be trained as a bonsai
I sense a challenge coming on here - someone come up with a carnivorous bonsai please. Bonus marks for achieving it but marks off for being predicatable and calling it Audrey. More bonus marks for the most original list of potential "plant food" - must give reasons for each entry. NB If you haven't seen Little Shop of Horrors this'll mean absolutely nothing to you.

btw Alain, I had a friend called Tina whose chat up technique was akin to a Pinguicula. She would almost literally lure the unsuspecting bloke and make him stick to her. I'll not tell you anay more - it wasn't a pretty sight!

What has this to do with bonsai? Who cares? It's early morning over here and I've been up for hours. Time for the first caffeine of the day and some breakfast. Feed me Seymour.

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  Teol on Mon Aug 10, 2009 9:42 pm

Catopsis berteroniana
Dionaea muscipula (already mentioned)
Drosera aberrans
Drosera andersoniana
Drosera banksii
Drosera binata
Drosera bulbosa
Drosera capensis
Drosera cistiflora
Drosera erythrorhiza
Drosera indica
Drosera platypoda
Drosera peltata
Drosera platypoda
Drosera scorpioides
Drosera stolonifera
Drosophyllum
Genlisea hispidula
Genlisea subglabra

This is how far I've gotten, though there are many more to go through. These are mostly checked to be perennial, but should one get any ideas one should check oneself to be sure. I'll be back with more soon Smile

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Re: Carnivorous plants

Post  Velodog2 on Mon Aug 10, 2009 9:52 pm

There are a number of pots with various types of pitcher plants around the koi pool at the National Arboretum in Washington DC. They are quite beautiful and have surprisingly nice flowers as well. Most there are rather tall for accent plantings but I believe there are shorter species. Personally I think they would be too distracting in a look-at-me kind of way to make a properly demure accent.

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