Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

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Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

Post  dick benbow on Fri Jul 20, 2012 4:44 pm

Yesterday, as a helpful gesture to a person just getting started in KOI, I offered to give him some Koi food that i had prepackaged and was getting close to it's expiration date. As a thank-you he brought over a couple of small
shohin style bonsai pots, that his business had found. I thanked him for the gesture, and after they had left turned the pots over ( man they were nice) to see the japanese chop marks. In stead I found the initials SR, for sara rayner, a minnesota potter. I immediately wrote him an email profusely thanking him for such a great gift and apologising for not immediately recognizing the maker. he wrote back and said he had no idea who had made them.
All this babbleing to say, that in the Koi world domestically bred fish do not carry the respect that a koi from japan does. is this the case for pots as well?

dick benbow
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Re: Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

Post  JimLewis on Fri Jul 20, 2012 4:54 pm

No. At least as far as "new" pots goes.

Antique pots are a different story. (But ARE there any antique domestic pots?)

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Re: Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

Post  Glaucus on Fri Jul 20, 2012 5:15 pm

Because some Japanese don't respect things not Japanese, we all should not respect?

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Re: Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

Post  marcus watts on Fri Jul 20, 2012 7:06 pm

The most interesting pots I'm seeing are from non japanese or chinese potters - and they are both respected and sought after. Some trees need a classic pot with perfect lines - and you cant beat oriental pots for this, especially in larger sizes. But for unique textures and glazes I'm always looking to European pots. . . jim. do you think 100 years is a fair goal post for an antique ? I think i do, so no I'm pretty sure there are not any european made bonsai pots anywhere near that old yet............some of the potters do look quite old though Very Happy Twisted Evil

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Re: Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

Post  dick benbow on Fri Jul 20, 2012 8:25 pm

If I'm beginning to get a picture from what has been said....maybe the age of the pot brings much to it's value than the location or origin. I love UK pots and have several Derek Aspinal's pots as well as a dan barton. but then
UK vintage I wouldn't have to call "domestic". Smile

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Re: Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

Post  Guest on Fri Jul 20, 2012 9:36 pm

In the west are there still no antique pots, as bonsai is too new...So maybe it is no use to speak about old chinese and japanese pots in this tread.

Looking the Tokonamecatalog ower, do I find the glazes they use, soon/now will need to be replaced with some other types. Or Tokonamepotters will find them self run dawn by some UK potters, who really understand usefull glazes for bonsaitrees.There are ofcourse also good potters in the rest of the west...but UK is "hot" at the moment ( if you ask me)

Kind regards Yvonne


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Re: Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Sat Jul 21, 2012 11:41 am

The way it is supposed to work is simple --------- you purchase and use what you like.

On my side, pots are rare, but to get out of the great internet pot discussions, I leave a fake moan on the topic.
The reality is, if a tree needs one of the more traditional shapes, I will import, but other than that I enjoy just adapting or making what I need.
[ cost is mostly determined by the difficulty of firing a shape and shipping.]

If I owned an antique pot, I would display it, and not use it. Not because of cost, but because I admired the craft of it's manufacture.

As I always type ---------- Bonsai are living, growing things, they soon, even in slowed time, out grow their pots, and lose their designed shape.
Use a photo or 3d programme, for the pinnacle moment of display.

Pots, hah, all I see is folk boasting about their low grade 'antique' pottery, made by some long forgotten maker.
Real history versus crafter history Crying or Very sad
Bonsai pots are not Fine Art ------------------ know the reality, know the difference.
Later.
Khaimraj

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Re: Is domestic pottery a "dirty Word"?

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