transplant shock

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transplant shock

Post  Garykk on Thu Jul 23, 2009 11:54 am

Here I would like to discuss the basics of what happens when moving a plant from an existing environment to a new environment. What is transplant shock and how the plant may be aided by using the correct approach of horticulture. Like all things worth doing right, I would like to start with some basic fundamentals, so give me a chance to jot down some things from my notes and we will get started. I promise it will get more exciting once we get started.

__gary

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Re: transplant shock

Post  Garykk on Thu Jul 23, 2009 11:28 pm

Any time we move a plant from one pot to another, plant a tree in the groung, dig a tree out of the ground, the root ball and in turn the whole plant experiences transplant shock. Some cases more severe than others but some change will always upset the balance so an understanding of the details is important.
A couple of things a plant performs is transpiration and respiration.
Transpiration is the loss of water from leaf surfaces. (my wife just called to say she was petting the Pesident's dog Bo in Wash DC). ok
Less than 2% of water uptake is actually used for phtosynthesis, the rest is lost in the atmosphere.
Respiration is a constant process of converting food into energy. Chemical energy generated by photosynthesis is stored as starch or sugar and used by the tree.
Thus it is important that photosynthesis (food making) exceeds respiration (food using). (Obama told my wife to give a shout out to the bonsai forum). ok
In the absence of phtosynthesis, the plant must rely on stored energy reserves.
Getting tired, just kidding about the President saying hi by the way.

__gary


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Re: transplant shock

Post  Garykk on Fri Jul 24, 2009 11:46 am

When transplanting a tree into a new environment seems to be the most demanding time for care and concern for the well being of the plant. You want to get every thing right esp if the move was a little rough on the root system. Roots may have been severed. Outer edges of root ball, most active area, may have been exposed to air and uv rays. Chop sticks may have been poked at root ball to remove soured old soil and so on.
Now that your tree is in its new environment, your horticulture skills go into over drive. You are going to make sure soil, pot drainage, light levels and moisture levels are just right and you are going to want to fertilize the plant with every product known to mankind. It is only normal, lol's. Now, just a little background on fertilizer. Just a little.
NPK.....functions of essential plant nutrients short version

Nitrogen (N): stimulates and essential in the formation of chlorophyll, formation of amino acids.

Phosphorous (P2O5): this nutrient is necessary for cell division, energy transfers and asssociated with the stimulating of Root growth.

Potassium (K2O): required for enzyme reactions and carbohydrate metabolism.

__gary

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Re: transplant shock

Post  waway on Fri Jul 24, 2009 2:29 pm

this is very interesting. im so excited on the rest of the article. pls keep coming thumbs up

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Re: transplant shock

Post  Garykk on Sat Jul 25, 2009 12:06 am

When I transplant a tree into its new home I might remove leaves to slow down transpiration. Sometimes we remove 50% of the existing soil and impail the root ball with chop sticks. Sounds cruel. Sometimes I dig up plants, put them in a bath tub, put them in a box, put the box on jet cargo, take delivery and put them in a gas house, put them on a stainless steel table, bring them home and expect miracles. All extremes, in all cases, I still treat them the same.
I hold off on Nitrogen. Growing leaves at this time is not going to help matters. I want roots. Big masses of new roots. In order to help this along I use fertilizer that is high in Phosphorous. The middle element of NPK formulas.
So products such as Polystart 8-30-5, Jump Start 5-20-4, Peters Root and Bloom 5-50-17 or good old Bonemeal. But stay away from too much Nitrogen. Hide your 20-20-20 if you get the impulse to use it, call a friend, do what ever it takes to avoid it until your root system is established. Good growing!

__gary

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Re: transplant shock

Post  fiona on Sat Jul 25, 2009 12:40 am

Garykk wrote: NPK.....functions of essential plant nutrients short version
Nitrogen (N): stimulates and essential in the formation of chlorophyll, formation of amino acids.
Phosphorous (P2O5): this nutrient is necessary for cell division, energy transfers and asssociated with the stimulating of Root growth.
Potassium (K2O): required for enzyme reactions and carbohydrate metabolism.
For what it's worth, the handy little jingle I always use with Horti students to help them remember what does what is:
NPK = Shoot, Root, Flower & Fruit. Singing it along to a really irritating tune means they will remember the order. "Scotland the Brave" works. Mad


Gary, what the b****y h*** is that dog wearing round its neck? First Dog or no First Dog, it would get laughed off the streets of Glasgow in a nano-second dressed like that!

Good articles btw - keep 'em coming!


Last edited by fionnghal on Sat Jul 25, 2009 12:41 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : forgot a sentence.)

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Re: transplant shock

Post  Garykk on Sat Jul 25, 2009 1:15 am

I am still waiting for the latest pics of Bo. Hopefully the rainbow fluff collar got burried in the Rose Garden and we will see Bo with a more appropriate look. Glad I could be of some service to you. Shoot, root, flower and fruit.... hey it works!

"If you want a friend in Washington, get a dog"

Harry S Truman

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Re: transplant shock

Post  JimLewis on Sun Jul 26, 2009 4:44 pm

Actually, though, you DO want leaves. The existing leaves will be in a state of shock, too and will not be functioning at their optimal level, and may even be dying. New leaves will have all channels open to the new roots you will be getting, so I tend to prefer my good ol' standard "balanced" fertilizer. Again, the plants use what they need; the rest flows out the drainage hole.

The amount of "transplant shock" also depends upon:

* the size of the plant being transplanted,
* How quickly it makes the transition to its new home, and, as always,
* The species being transplanted. Some species of trees and shrubs simply HATE to be transplanted. Some think it is a lot of FUN.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: transplant shock

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