My biggest Ficus

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  lordy on Mon Jan 21, 2013 6:09 pm

Several occasions have presented themselves to me like this. One time I carved a drain at the bottom. Another time I used 2-part epoxy to make a ring that fit into the shallow scar. I packed it into the circle and formed a bit of a funnel that allowed the collecting water to run out. The epoxy was white+black parts that turned a much less noticable gray when mixed (like clay) so it was not too obvious. You can also make indentations in it before it cures that makes it look more like bark.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Mon Jan 21, 2013 6:30 pm

lordy wrote:Several occasions have presented themselves to me like this. One time I carved a drain at the bottom. Another time I used 2-part epoxy to make a ring that fit into the shallow scar. I packed it into the circle and formed a bit of a funnel that allowed the collecting water to run out. The epoxy was white+black parts that turned a much less noticable gray when mixed (like clay) so it was not too obvious. You can also make indentations in it before it cures that makes it look more like bark.

Thanks Lordy. I plan on bringing this tree with me on a trip to Meehans Miniatures in Maryland this Saturday to let the Meehans look at it and see what they suggest for that button. Maybe they can carve a drain for me (I don't have a dremel).

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  lordy on Mon Jan 21, 2013 6:39 pm

I used an exacto knife. Or you could use a razor blade or even a nice sharp woodworking chisel.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Just Mike on Mon Jan 21, 2013 7:34 pm

i usually use modeling clay when i have a big scar like that...it doesnt look at all like bark, but its cheap, works well, and is easy to remove when/if need be...

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  rps on Mon Jan 21, 2013 7:54 pm

i have had some success in coaxing ficus to continue growing over similar wounds, simply by using a sharp pen [or grafting] knife to scrape away the bark along the inside of the ring. once re-wounded they set out to heal themselves with new growth. repeat as necessary.
of course, that does not address your immediate concern.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Just Mike on Mon Jan 21, 2013 9:24 pm

rps wrote:i have had some success in coaxing ficus to continue growing over similar wounds, simply by using a sharp pen [or grafting] knife to scrape away the bark along the inside of the ring. once re-wounded they set out to heal themselves with new growth. repeat as necessary.
of course, that does not address your immediate concern.

i saw a method of removing branches somewhere (cant remember where right now, but ill try to find it) where you basically cut out a notch of the branch to be removed, let that heal, then remove a little more...this was supposed to speed up the healing since the tree still had sap flowoing through the branch...i havnt tried it yet, but i would imagine, this could also be a usefull technique for removing large branches to ensure the scar heals over the entire wound...the technique was demonstrated on an acer palmatum, but i dont see why it wouldnt work on just about any species with the exception of a few...

with that said, i have had luck doing what you suggested as far as wounding the scar tissue, and this is my current method of doing things, but i plan on trying the other technique at some point soon...

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  lordy on Mon Jan 21, 2013 11:49 pm

Just Mike wrote:
rps wrote:i have had some success in coaxing ficus to continue growing over similar wounds, simply by using a sharp pen [or grafting] knife to scrape away the bark along the inside of the ring. once re-wounded they set out to heal themselves with new growth. repeat as necessary.
of course, that does not address your immediate concern.

i saw a method of removing branches somewhere (cant remember where right now, but ill try to find it) where you basically cut out a notch of the branch to be removed, let that heal, then remove a little more...this was supposed to speed up the healing since the tree still had sap flowoing through the branch...i havnt tried it yet, but i would imagine, this could also be a usefull technique for removing large branches to ensure the scar heals over the entire wound...the technique was demonstrated on an acer palmatum, but i dont see why it wouldnt work on just about any species with the exception of a few...

with that said, i have had luck doing what you suggested as far as wounding the scar tissue, and this is my current method of doing things, but i plan on trying the other technique at some point soon...
I had this technique done to a trident maple of mine by a well-known left-coast-based master with a very long last name. He cut throught about 3/4 of a branch that he declared needed to be removed. He instructed me to finish the removal after about a year, which I did. I then cut off another opposing branch all at once. Three years after the notch cut and two years after the complete cut of the other branch, I must admit that I really cannot see an appreciable difference in the apparent rate at which the two cuts have begun to heal. Both have about the same amount of healing given the amount of time they have been done. For me the jury may be hung...

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  rps on Mon Jan 21, 2013 11:55 pm

lordy wrote:
Just Mike wrote:
i saw a method of removing branches somewhere (cant remember where right now, but ill try to find it) where you basically cut out a notch of the branch to be removed, let that heal, then remove a little more...this was supposed to speed up the healing since the tree still had sap flowoing through the branch...i havnt tried it yet, but i would imagine, this could also be a usefull technique for removing large branches to ensure the scar heals over the entire wound...the technique was demonstrated on an acer palmatum, but i dont see why it wouldnt work on just about any species with the exception of a few...

with that said, i have had luck doing what you suggested as far as wounding the scar tissue, and this is my current method of doing things, but i plan on trying the other technique at some point soon...
I had this technique done to a trident maple of mine by a well-known left-coast-based master with a very long last name. He cut throught about 3/4 of a branch that he declared needed to be removed. He instructed me to finish the removal after about a year, which I did. I then cut off another opposing branch all at once. Three years after the notch cut and two years after the complete cut of the other branch, I must admit that I really cannot see an appreciable difference in the apparent rate at which the two cuts have begun to heal. Both have about the same amount of healing given the amount of time they have been done. For me the jury may be hung...

is there any notable difference in how the two wounds have healed over? by which i mean, is one scar more discreet than the other?

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  lordy on Tue Jan 22, 2013 12:52 am

cant recall. The tree has been in the ground now for about 2 years, and I have not been down to look closely in a while. The original master left us with the impression that it was a method to accelerate the rate of healing.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Guest on Tue Jan 22, 2013 5:42 am

rps wrote:
lordy wrote:
Just Mike wrote:
i saw a method of removing branches somewhere (cant remember where right now, but ill try to find it) where you basically cut out a notch of the branch to be removed, let that heal, then remove a little more...this was supposed to speed up the healing since the tree still had sap flowoing through the branch...i havnt tried it yet, but i would imagine, this could also be a usefull technique for removing large branches to ensure the scar heals over the entire wound...the technique was demonstrated on an acer palmatum, but i dont see why it wouldnt work on just about any species with the exception of a few...

with that said, i have had luck doing what you suggested as far as wounding the scar tissue, and this is my current method of doing things, but i plan on trying the other technique at some point soon...
I had this technique done to a trident maple of mine by a well-known left-coast-based master with a very long last name. He cut throught about 3/4 of a branch that he declared needed to be removed. He instructed me to finish the removal after about a year, which I did. I then cut off another opposing branch all at once. Three years after the notch cut and two years after the complete cut of the other branch, I must admit that I really cannot see an appreciable difference in the apparent rate at which the two cuts have begun to heal. Both have about the same amount of healing given the amount of time they have been done. For me the jury may be hung...

is there any notable difference in how the two wounds have healed over? by which i mean, is one scar more discreet than the other?

Hi guys!

One of the method I am using to heal huge cut wounds fast is to let a branch grow near the cut wound----This is also another form of using sacrificial branch as this branch will later be be moved if it already served its purpose. In some species you can even graft a new branch for this purpose.



Continued slight wounding (more like scratches and bruise) on the edge of the wound will also heal wounds fast.



regards,
jun Smile

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Andre Beaurain on Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:53 am

...Before the days of cutting paste and wound sealant, we used wax, well, I was about 3, hihihihihihihi

I think it will work to keep the bellybutton from collecting water, drip some wax into the wound till it fills up. That should keep it dry. me thinks. If you dont like the idea of a white scar, use brown wax. wow I'm really thinking out of the box now, I'm scaring myself!

love and light
Andre

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:03 pm

Thanks everyone, good ideas all around.

I shot Martha Meehan (Owner of Meehans Miniatures in Maryland) an email asking about what she would do, and I got this response:

"Honestly I wouldn't worry about it, but if you wanted to do something I would carve out the dead wood (dremel)treat the wound with cut paste, and call it a day. I would not use wood hardener on it the wound is healing over already, the cut paste would just make it happen more quickly."


Anyone agree with it and would do the same?

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  lordy on Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:08 pm

Cut paste is not permanent nor does it harden, so if you dont like what's happening you could remove it easily. Give it a shot. Martha's handled a tree or two in her time. She knows of what she speaks.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Sat Jan 26, 2013 6:37 pm

Took this tree up to Meehans today, and Martha did some work on that spot. She dremeled through it down to the live wood, made a small channel so water doesn't pool there, and covered it in cut paste. Also gave it a small trim to get started on some backbud.





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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:00 pm

Since I last updated, I have cut back that large middle branch. After having it outside for a couple of weeks, it has started to backbud. I'm going to be gone at the beach for the next week and we're expecting lows in the low 50s, so I've moved the tree indoors until I get back. I don't want to risk the new buds from being damaged. So for the next week it will be indoors under 6 bulbs of T5 lighting.





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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:55 pm

Well I've got plenty of bud options now Very Happy


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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  bucknbonsai on Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:03 pm

i see clusters of shoots exiting from the same point  (on the central stalk as well as off your branches)  they need to be eliminated down to 1 shoot exiting from each point

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Wed Jun 26, 2013 12:06 am

bucknbonsai wrote:i see clusters of shoots exiting from the same point  (on the central stalk as well as off your branches)  they need to be eliminated down to 1 shoot exiting from each point


Oh I know, I'm just letting them grow out before I start removing them. Want to make sure the growth isn't going to die.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Mon Jul 01, 2013 12:17 am

I went ahead and thinned out each cluster and the tree seems pretty happy.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Sat Sep 13, 2014 4:27 am

Remember this tree?

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  LanceMac10 on Sat Sep 13, 2014 5:48 am

How often do you prune during the growing season? Do you site the tree in full sun during the growing season? Do you feed heavily, along with copious amounts of water during the growing season? If you do, you should be able to cut back hard several times after night time temps hold steady in the upper 60's, your leaves should reduce with each successive pruning. It seems as the leaves you have are a bit big, full sun and heavy feeding after deep pruning provide abundant shots with tiny leaves. Cut more!! Maybe turn it around, cut the weird stovepipe in the center, use that lower branch to the right as your first branch, and continue the remaining lines of the tree off of the branch on the left. Mind you, I have no idea what I'm talking about, I just really wanted to see if I could type something legible. Good luck with the lill' fella....

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Precarious on Sat Sep 13, 2014 11:42 pm

Im glad you kept, and are showing, the hole.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Sam Ogranaja on Sun Sep 14, 2014 3:00 pm

Damn Ryan,

I really like this one. Great job this far!!!

I disagree with Lance's cut more comment only because of the style I would create with what you've got. To me it looks like a great base for a monster banyan. I like your friends virt (the tall one you posted) but a low, wide, powerful banyan can easily be achieved. If you go the banyan route, with all the branches you'll have to build, the belly button will close up as well.

I think you have a chance to create the reference of how to build a very well done banyan style. Check out Master Min Hsuan Lo's bonsai for inspiration and guidance.

Keep us posted Smile

Have a great weekend!!!
Sam

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Ryan on Mon Sep 15, 2014 1:43 am

Thanks everyone.


The only cutting I'll be doing at this point is to trim the branches back in an attempt to get buds in closer to the trunk. Right now all the growth is out on the ends of the branches. I'll probably do that tomorrow, right before I bring it indoors for the winter.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

Post  Neli on Mon Sep 15, 2014 11:53 am

Looking good Ryan...try to make it with umbrella like wide round canopy...like veld fig style...google it.

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Re: My biggest Ficus

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