Bonsai for the Disabled

Page 2 of 3 Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Poink88 on Fri Jun 01, 2012 4:33 pm

Joe Hatfield wrote:You can use bicycle handle bar wrap. I use this on some of my tools for grip and padding.

That's a good tip. Which do you think work better, this or tennis racket grip wraps?

Poink88
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Joe Hatfield on Fri Jun 01, 2012 4:38 pm

I have never tried the tennis racket tape. I think its probably similar. When looking at racket tape it seemed to be a little thinner then some of the foam like tapes I have used associated with bikes. I am sure there are some specs available online if thickness and materials are in question. My first impressions are that the bike tape will be more durable or maybe a tad more absorbent in regard to shock. But again, I have not looked at specs.



Joe Hatfield
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  JimLewis on Fri Jun 01, 2012 8:25 pm

Tennis wraps may be too wide to go on the handles of many bonsai and garden tools.

Good ol' rubber/plastic black plumber's tape may work as well. And if you can find it in colors (like the bike wrap) the tool will show up in the grass when you inevitably drop it.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

JimLewis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  lordy on Fri Jun 01, 2012 10:55 pm

JimLewis wrote:Tennis wraps may be too wide to go on the handles of many bonsai and garden tools.

Good ol' rubber/plastic black plumber's tape may work as well. And if you can find it in colors (like the bike wrap) the tool will show up in the grass when you inevitably drop it.
this sounds like experience talking here... Wink

lordy
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Sat Jun 02, 2012 1:19 am

I can envision a plan where a large bonsai club or nursery could sponsor a bonsai therapy program in partnership with a VA hospital or other medical facility, helping to provide both supplies & expertise.

Our club tried doing Bonsai at an Assisted Living Facility, but the residents were mostly interested in the companionship than Bonsai. I am afraid that Bonsai is a rather limited interest even in places like Japan. Even at the big Japanese shows I think there are a lot of lookers with no real interest in having their own trees.

Billy M. Rhodes
Member


Back to top Go down

Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bonsaisr on Sat Jun 02, 2012 3:06 am

In general, I have found that the elderly do not respond to bonsai. A therapy program needs to be aimed at a younger population.
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  JimLewis on Sat Jun 02, 2012 12:33 pm

bonsaisr wrote:In general, I have found that the elderly do not respond to bonsai. A therapy program needs to be aimed at a younger population.
Iris

I don't think I'd be interested in starting up bonsai at 75, either. Don't have enough time.

But for younger people going through rehabilitation and therapy of various kinds after traumatic injury, I'd think it could be a relaxing godsend (so long as no one assigned them a Serissa to work on).

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

JimLewis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Todd Ellis on Tue Jun 05, 2012 1:41 pm

Hello Iris et al,
I started growing bonsai in the late 1970's, I had acquired numerous trees and went through the "too many to care for..." in the following decade. Then, I sold my collection during a major life-changing event and then got back into the hobby. Then my hips deteriorated; I sold my nicest and biggest trees with thoughts that I would not be able to do this hobby in the way I wanted to; I couldn't lift the trees, much less get out to water them. Many other trees went into nursery pots or in the ground; I got depressed and then had the surgery; both hips replaced at one time. I planned my surgery for early Spring and was able to start working on them again; it was part of my pt plan. I recovered and am back to maintaining a large collection again. I learned that despite major setbacks, I love this art and intend to participate in bonsai for the rest of my life. It is my hope that my trees will outlive me. To that end I will care for them to the best of my abilities; I can do no more than that. If the dexterity of wiring is not an option for you, perhaps utilizing clip & grow is a solution. Hang in there and do your best!

Todd Ellis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bonsaisr on Tue Jun 05, 2012 9:31 pm

Todd Ellis wrote: If the dexterity of wiring is not an option for you, perhaps utilizing clip & grow is a solution.
I think I mentioned this before: Clip & grow is more suited to the South. Our growing season is too short. Also, as the only technique, it is much too slow for someone my age. In practice, most of us around here use a combination of wiring & clip-and-grow.
I never gave up on bonsai completely, but I have been going more toward shohin & small bonsai, and trying not to own too many. lol! The few big ones, like the saikei & rock planting, somebody else carries for me.
I can do most of my own wiring. Occasionally my husband helps with heavier wire. In the few cases where I need 5 or 6 mm, I get a bonsai buddy or teacher to help. We used to have a member whose hands were crippled up with RA. I think Bill did most of her wiring in workshops.
I could have told you how successful hip replacements are. thumbs up My knee replacements are also going to be successful, but it takes much longer. Unfortunately, replacements don't last the rest of your life. My right hip is starting to go. It is 16 years old & got a lot of stress from the bad knee. But hip replacements go so quickly these days that I am not concerned.
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bonsaisr on Sun Jul 29, 2012 4:13 pm

I just had a sad experience. A garden club invited me to give a presentation. I accepted, but I told the lady that I am somewhat handicapped. I can walk up a couple of steps, but I can't climb a whole flight of stairs. This club meets in people's homes. She said she would find out which house was the most suitable. (Last time I spoke to a garden club, it was at somebody's house & worked out fine.)
The other day the garden club lady called to tell me they couldn't find a suitable house and the program was canceled.
It's no skin off my nose. Garden club ladies around here never go into bonsai. But I'm thinking, what if there is a disabled gardener in that neighborhood who wants to join their club?
Our bonsai club has been meeting in handicapped accessible locations for years. WHAT ABOUT YOURS?
Conclusion: I am going to introduce an amendment to our by-laws that our club will always meet in a handicapped accessible location insofar as possible.
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Jkd2572 on Sun Jul 29, 2012 6:01 pm

I have Joshua Roth professional grade bonsai tools. They come with a nice red rubber coating on the handles. Very nice to work with.

Jkd2572
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Todd Ellis on Sun Jul 29, 2012 6:09 pm

Iris,
Thank you for informing us &/or reminding us about those with physical challenges.

Todd

Todd Ellis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Sun Jul 29, 2012 7:35 pm

Our club meets at a public library community room. We are allowed to use it free, but there are restrictions. The library closes at 5 PM so we meet from 1 to 4 on Sat. afternoon. Also government use kicks us out, so during election season we can lose the space for "early" voting.

Billy M. Rhodes
Member


Back to top Go down

Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bonsaisr on Sun Jul 29, 2012 9:06 pm

According to the Americans with Disabilities Act, public buildings are usually accessible. Places of worship cannot be forced to comply, but most of them try to. The church where we meet is retrofitted with a wheelchair lift/elevator.
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Kirk on Sun Jul 29, 2012 9:55 pm

bonsaisr wrote:In general, I have found that the elderly do not respond to bonsai. A therapy program needs to be aimed at a younger population.
Iris

I'm a registered horticultural therapist at Emory in Atlanta and use bonsai quite a bit with my geriatric patients. It's a great tool for working on fine/gross motor skills, as well as, decreasing stress and anxiety. They may not rush home and pick up the hobby, but they enjoy the process while we work together. It has also worked quite well with some of my students who are young vets with PTSD.

Best,
Kirk

Kirk
Member


Back to top Go down

Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bonsaisr on Mon Jul 30, 2012 3:18 am

I think we're talking apples & oranges. In a therapy program onsite, where the material, tools, & environment are provided, and with a skilled therapist, of course they will respond. But when I have put on bonsai displays in geriatric settings, there was little interest.
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bumblebee on Tue Jul 31, 2012 4:45 pm

Iris,

Quilters have developed some tools for their use that may be useful with bonsai. There are good splints to help wrists that can be had that really help with tender wrists. Also scissors that reopen themselves are a huge benefit to painful hands and fingers. I just bet that you could make use of them for your trees. Those are 2 ideas that came to mind while reading this thread but there are more. Go to quilting sites online and check them out. Many women have to figure out how to adapt quilting to aging, arthritic hands and fingers, sore backs, painful shoulders. Another thought. occupational therapists make their living figuring out how to teach people ways to continue to live their lives like they want to. Maybe while in therapy sometime you could pick the brain of one of those guys. Insurance would probably even pay for the conversation! I've heard it said that getting old ain't for sissies! The older I get the more I see the wisdom in those words. Good luck!

Libby

bumblebee
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Leo Schordje on Tue Aug 14, 2012 5:06 am

I am now dealing with back issues and nerve issues. (numbness and spasms) A godsend was several sessions with an occupational therapist. She helped me get used to the idea that I have to plan my movements. Yes, it means I am now SLOW. It takes longer, sometimes much longer to do things, but I can still do them.

I have to pay close attention to posture. I had to make new work spaces at more appropriate heights so I wasn't reaching up or stooping over and down. If you are going to pick up and carry something, clear the path way and make sure you have no obstacles between yourself and the object to be lifted and the destination. Plan ahead.

Pacing was the other focus. Know your standing and sitting tolerance and take breaks BEFORE you fatigue your muscles. Ignore pacing, you can flare up your pain and end up out of commission for a longer period than if you took breaks while working on the trees.

All this means that what once took an hour might take 2 or 3 hours.

As Betty Davis once said "Getting old ain't for sissies".

Leo Schordje
Member


Back to top Go down

Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bonsaisr on Tue Aug 14, 2012 2:58 pm

This is for denizens of upstate NY. A friend and I recently visited the Violet Barn, in Naples, heart of the wine country. http://www.violetbarn.com/
Aside from their varied collection and spotless greenhouse, I was pleased to find that they are completely accessible, even the restroom. This is despite the fact that they are basically a mail-order business. The attraction for bonsai growers is the selection of accent plants and starters of various tropicals.
Iris
Bagpiper thumbs up

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bonsaisr on Thu Nov 21, 2013 5:47 pm

I recovered from the knee replacements & have since had a shoulder replacement. The latter takes a long recovery, since the shoulder moves in so many different directions, and mine was frozen for 20 years or so. But now I can work on bonsai with two contributing arms. My biggest problem right now is a leftover muscle paralysis from a hip replacement that makes walking very difficult. And Medicare won't pay for the therapy until January.
I am collecting more shohin trees. A sure-fire solution to "I could only afford this stick-in-a-pot with a skinny trunk." We had a presentation on shohin bonsai at our club, from Mark Arpag, and I learned a lot. I also bought a tiny Shimpakuleh for winter displays.
Main question today is about finger muscle cramps. What works for other bonsaiseniors? I was told to take magnesium, but it didn't help much. Co-Q-10 also helps a little. Recently I saw an ad on the Internet for magnesium malate. It claimed that serum electrolyte tests don't measure the magnesium in your muscles, which can still be deficient, but this compound gets into the muscles. I ordered a month's supply, then of course found out it is much cheaper at the drug store. So far I think it helps. Has anyone else tried it?
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  ironhorse on Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:46 pm

Hi Iris

I have osteoarthritis in my hands and I find that Voltarol gel is effective in reducing pain - this is possibly just a UK brand name but the effective ingredient is diclofenac potassium if this helps you find a US equivalent. Keeping hands warm helps too, I get cramps and joint pain is worse when they are cold, fingerless gloves are useful. I was recommended by a rheumatologist to try Glucosamine tablets but those didn't work, Glucosamine gel was slightly helpful but not as effective as Voltarol. No experience though of the magnesium based products.

Dave

ironhorse
Member


Back to top Go down

Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  bonsaisr on Fri Nov 22, 2013 2:24 am

That is probably only a European brand. Never heard of it. Anyway, my problem is muscle spasms, not joint pain. Temperature is not a factor. Glucosamine is for cartilage. It gave me intolerable side effects. And I can't put stuff on my hands when I'm using them. I think the magnesium malate is the best answer.
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  john jones on Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:25 am

Magnesium is supposed to relax muscles. That's what they gave my wife when she was in premature labor, and Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) is still the best thing going for soaking stiff muscles and such.




john jones
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  my nellie on Fri Nov 22, 2013 9:07 am

Mrs. Iris, you could make a little search on the internet about aloe vera drinking gel. It is said to be a great help for musculoskeletal problems and it is natural of course. One friend of mine has been taking this a long time now (used to buy it electronically, since this was not yet at that time imported in Greece) with very good results.

my nellie
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Leo Schordje on Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:10 pm

ironhorse wrote:Hi Iris

I have osteoarthritis in my hands and I find that Voltarol gel is effective in reducing pain - this is possibly just a UK brand name but the effective ingredient is diclofenac potassium if this helps you find a US equivalent.  Keeping hands warm helps too, I get cramps and joint pain is worse when they are cold, fingerless gloves are useful.  I was recommended by a rheumatologist to try Glucosamine tablets but those didn't work, Glucosamine gel was slightly helpful but not as effective as Voltarol.  No experience though of the magnesium based products.

Dave
Hi Iris,
Iron Horse's on to something. I have severe arthritis. In the USA the label for Voltarol is Voltarin. It is prescription only, and it really works well for me. I can not take diclofenac in oral form, due to stomach upset. The gel bypasses the stomach and causes no upset. Really works well, pain relief begins about 30 min after applying. Biggest mistake people make is using too little. If the prescription says use a bead of lotion 3 inches long, use that much, that is the amount needed as a minimum to get an effective dose. Really effective, and safe for the stomach. I love the stuff. Really helps my hands. Ask your rheumatologist.

Leo Schordje
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Bonsai for the Disabled

Post  Sponsored content Today at 6:03 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 3 Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum