New saggar pots

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New saggar pots

Post  yamadorian on Fri May 11, 2012 11:43 am

Hi, my last saggar pots..






















26 x 12 cm.

And some accent pots



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Re: New saggar pots

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Fri May 11, 2012 12:00 pm

These are nice pots. What does "saggar" mean? Is it a translation thing or a pottery term?

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  Rob Addonizio on Sat May 12, 2012 3:52 am

Beautiful work!

Must say that I really love the bowls in the second to last group. Very lovely.

Thanks for sharing,
Rob

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  DWThomas on Sat May 12, 2012 3:56 am

Neat stuff!

Saggar is a pottery term, a method of firing pieces, usually in individual containers made of ceramic. We did a little bit of it in a class last fall where individual pieces were wrapped in aluminum foil after spraying, dabbing and packing various mysterious compounds on the piece. Ours was a sort of pit fire, after which the foil was pretty well gone, but we did get some interesting patterns.

A historic pottery not far from where I sit did saggar firing of slip decorated redware. The pieces were placed in fired clay containers. You can see some just inside the left of the kiln door in this picture. This was a monstrous "beehive" sort of kiln, wood fired.


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sagger makers bottom knocker

Post  Tony Remington on Sat May 12, 2012 8:41 am

"Sagger makers bottom knocker" This has got to be the silliest name for any job. follow this link for article on saggers. http://www.thepotteries.org/bottle_kiln/saggar.htm
Tony

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  vivian on Sat May 12, 2012 9:30 am

hard to use for bonsaï, but beautiful texture, i love the first.

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  Brett Summers on Sat May 12, 2012 10:46 am

Hi DW they look great, could you list a few of the spraying, dabbing and packing various mysterious compounds on the piece that you did.
Thanks

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  Klaudia & Martin on Sat May 12, 2012 12:33 pm

Again, very nice work yamadorian.

Kind regards
Klaudia

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  DWThomas on Sat May 12, 2012 3:13 pm

Brett Summers wrote:Hi DW they look great, could you list a few of the spraying, dabbing and packing various mysterious compounds on the piece that you did.
Thanks

The pots shown above were done by Yamadorian. So he'll have to tell us about that. I just tossed in an an answer to Billy's question.

In our class one thing we used was ferric chloride (the chemical used to etch copper printed circuit boards) sprayed on. Another was wrapping the piece with sphagnum moss that was wet with copper sulphate solution. Yet another was referred to as "swamp grit" or some such name which was a wet paste of some fairly coarse gritty materials which I assume were minerals maybe related to some of the colorants in glazing, but alas, we never got a recipe for what was in it. Note that some caution is in order in handling and using some of this stuff!

The aluminum foil held the magic stuff in direct contact with the piece. The more traditional saggar firing appears to rely more on fumes, although if the piece were packed in sawdust you'd get lots of reduction and possibly some raku-like effects. The class I refer to was actually in raku firing, but our instructor brought in a friend to give us a taste of some alternate firing techniques. That link leads to a series of shots, some of the foil wrapped sagger firing and some raku. It's not well organized or very complete as I couldn't participate and play photographer at the same time. Shocked

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  Jim Doiron on Sat May 12, 2012 6:39 pm

Wow, fantastic finishes ,I have always enjoyed saggar fired pots. Thanks for sharing.

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  yamadorian on Sat May 12, 2012 7:01 pm

Hi everyone-thanks for the nice comments... We use tin saggars in a raku kiln-and place previously burnished pieces on a sawdust bed; use pine needles, dried moss and nut shells, while sprinkling salt, copper and iron sulphates, barium and lithium carbonates around the pieces. A good way for good results is to place a piece in a piece that is larger than it-around 3cm/1 inch hollow space should be filled with the above materials. And we fire our saggars up to raku temperatures quickly, after inside of the kiln turns a glowing red, we turn off the heat source and cover the holes of the kiln and leave it to reduction for another 3-4 hours. That's it...

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  timatkinson on Sat May 12, 2012 11:06 pm

Speaking from a traditional pottery background, a "sagger" protects a piece of pottery from direct contact with the fire. This became especially important when the pottery esthetic required "clean" unblemished glaze surfaces. I think the current practice where the surface is intentionally affected by flame and ash and packed in misc organic and inorganic materials is a more contemporary idea...Where the use of a "sagger" is the opposite of it's traditional use. Any further comments from the potters out there? Warm regards - Tim Atkinson

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  DWThomas on Sun May 13, 2012 4:34 am

timatkinson wrote:Speaking from a traditional pottery background, a "sagger" protects a piece of pottery from direct contact with the fire. This became especially important when the pottery esthetic required "clean" unblemished glaze surfaces. I think the current practice where the surface is intentionally affected by flame and ash and packed in misc organic and inorganic materials is a more contemporary idea...Where the use of a "sagger" is the opposite of it's traditional use. Any further comments from the potters out there? Warm regards - Tim Atkinson

I think you are right. The kiln and saggars I pictured above were used with slip decorated redware and I suspect that was for cleanliness, especially considering that monster was wood fired. I also have the impression today's raku firing is not what the family who originated it actually did either.

It still boggles my aging mind how many things one can tangle with in the clay arts. It seems even just glazing could be a life's work in itself.

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  Rob Addonizio on Sun May 13, 2012 12:09 pm

DWThomas wrote:

It still boggles my aging mind how many things one can tangle with in the clay arts. It seems even just glazing could be a life's work in itself.

Ah yes, and on this I must agree..... Laughing Laughing Laughing

...and the learning just goes on and on!

Rob

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  Russell Coker on Sun May 13, 2012 3:26 pm



vivian wrote:hard to use for bonsaï, but beautiful texture, i love the first.


Really? Why? I'd be proud to have - and use - any one of them!

Beautiful work!

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  GaryWood on Sun May 13, 2012 3:58 pm

Russell Coker wrote:

vivian wrote:hard to use for bonsaï, but beautiful texture, i love the first.


Really? Why? I'd be proud to have - and use - any one of them!

Beautiful work!
@Russell, the pottery world has its can of worms also Very Happy Sometimes durability is an issue with lowfire clay and sometimes colors are transient when exposed to the elements. Terracotta pots are an example. For some people they are perfectly fine for their conditions but for others they may only last a year because of the freeze\thaw cycle.

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  Russell Coker on Thu May 17, 2012 1:19 pm


I don't know anything about firing pots and when someone mentions 'cones' I'm clueless. I couldn't find any mention in this thread of these pots being low fired and the colors not holding, but I didn't open the links. Maybe you and Vivian know something I don't! I know what I like when I see it, and I like these - especailly as shohin pots.

Oh, and the freeze/thaw cycle isn't an issue for me, and God willing, it never will be!


Last edited by Russell Coker on Thu May 17, 2012 1:20 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : added thought)

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Wow...

Post  halydean on Sat May 26, 2012 7:53 pm

Halydean thinks these are the most beautiful bonsai pots in the world... WOW!

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Re: New saggar pots

Post  EdMerc on Wed May 30, 2012 6:23 pm

Russell Coker wrote:
I couldn't find any mention in this thread of these pots being low fired and the colors not holding, but I didn't open the links.

I could be wrong (I'm no potter), but I think that Saggar, just like Raku, are low fired techniques. A low fired pot typically means it's not as hard and thus more susceptible to damage.

Anyone, please correct me if I'm wrong. Smile

Ed.

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Re: New saggar pots

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